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Charles H. Ray (Chicago Tribune)

Obituary
“Dr. Charles H. Ray,” Chicago (IL) Tribune, September 26, 1870, p. 2.
With Dr. Ray’s connection with THE TRIBUNE, and his manly, straightforward, and vigorous editorial conduct during the Chicago riots, the excitement of the Kansas war, the war of the rebellion, and all the great events which culminated in the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency, the public are familiar. His writings were so sharp and trenchant, so eloquently denunciatory of wrong and so searching in criticism, that they were copied far and wide, and exerted a powerful influence – always upon the side of the right, and did much to establish its reputation as a fearless outspoken journal. He wrote with an untiring vigor and with a searching analysis which went down to the very heart and core of the matter, whether he was exposing some iniquitous political scheme or moral wrong, or was exhibiting some military official in the light of his incompetency. There was not a “conservative” drop of blood in his veins. He always expected, and demanded, progress, both political, moral and humane. He never needed any urging in a radical direction; but, on the other hand, his zeal sometimes needed restraint. He never consulted policy, for he had no policy in his disposition. He never looked at consequences when he believed himself right, for he was absolutely fearless. When once settled upon a course, he would say to his associates – This is the right course, and we must pursue it to the end, regardless of consequences. He cared for no pecuniary injury as the result of advocating an unpopular doctrine. When scribers dropped off, as a consequence, he would say, “Let them go. We are . They will all come back in a few weeks, and bring others with them,” and his words were more than once verified.
How to Cite This Page: "Charles H. Ray (Chicago Tribune)," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/26688.