Garibaldi leaves Naples and retires to private life on his farm on the island of Caprera

Early in the morning, without fanfare, Giuseppe Garibaldi, having turned over his conquests in southern Italy to King Victor Emmanuel II, left Naples aboard the steamship Washington for his estate on the island of Caprera, off the coast of Sardinia.  He had refused all honors or rewards and famously traveled with a sack of seed corn for his farm.  He would remain there until his ill-fated "March on Rome" two years later.  (By John Osborne)
Source Citation
 G.M. Trevelyan, Garibaldi and the Thousand, May 1860 (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1916), 285.
Date Certainty
Exact
Type
US/the World
How to Cite This Page: "Garibaldi leaves Naples and retires to private life on his farm on the island of Caprera," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/34257.