In northern England, textile manufacturers honor General "Stonewall" Jackson and mourn his death

General "Stonewall" Jackson was much admired in England by the wealthy cotton manufacturers supporting the C.S.A., and his death had produced a romantic reaction.  At a meeting in Sheffield, led by a city alderman, motions were passed to send heartfelt condolences to Jackson's widow and to his troops.  Elsewhere, a subcription was begun for a statue to be executed and presented to the Confederacy and flags were flown at half-staff by mill-owners at Stockport in Lancashire. The statue was finally unveiled in Richmond in 1875.  (By John Osborne)
Source Citation
Frank Moore, ed., The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives, Illustrative Incidents, Poetry, Etc. (New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1861), VII: 2.
R. J. M. Blacket, Divided Hearts: Britain and the American Civil War (Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 2001), 48-49.
Charles P. Cullop, "English Reaction to Stonewall Jackson's Death," West Virginia History 29 (October 1967-July 1968), p. 4.
Date Certainty
Exact
Type
US/the World
How to Cite This Page: "In northern England, textile manufacturers honor General "Stonewall" Jackson and mourn his death," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/39849.