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In Milledgeville, Georgia becomes the second state to reject the Fourteenth Amendment.

Georgia State Capitol, Milledgeville, Georgia, in Union hands, November 1864, artist's impression
11/09/1866

Governor Charles Jenkins of Georgia had argued against the Fourteenth Amendment and a joint committee of the state legislature agreed, arguing in part that Georgia, as a founding member of the United States had not lost that status now that the Civil War had ended and therefore the Fourteenth Amendment had been passed through the Congress without proper representation.  The state house voted the same day as the committee reported, 147 votes to two, not to ratify, as did the state senate, unanimously.  Georgia later voted ratification in July 1868 but under significant changed political circumstances.  (By John Osborne)

Source Citation: 

Horace Edgar Flack, The Adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, 1908), 192.
"Georgia," The American Cyclopedia and Register of Important Events of the Year 1866 (New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1873), 351-353.

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How to Cite This Page: "In Milledgeville, Georgia becomes the second state to reject the Fourteenth Amendment. ," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/45949.