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Georgia legislature passes law enabling the sale into slavery of free blacks indicted for vagrancy

Georgia, 1857, zoomable map
12/17/1859
Georgia passed the latest in a recent set of laws designed to protect the institution of slavery with a statute that enable the sale at slave auction of any free black indicted for vagrancy.  Earlier the state had banned masters freeing slaves in their will and enacted a measure to ban free blacks from entering the state.  Under the law, a vagrant was  "any free person of color wandering or strolling about, or leading an idle, immoral or profligate course of life..." (By John Osborne)
Source Citation: 
Charles M. Christian, Sari Bennett, Black Saga: the African American Experience : a Chronology (New York: Civitas Press, 1999), 169.
John Codman Hurd, The Laws of Freedom and Bondage in the United States, Volume II (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1862), 109.

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