Washington, DC

Boundaries and Extent. — The District, as at present limited, containing less than two thirds of the original land surface, is bounded on the north-west, north-east, and south-east, by the counties of Montgomery and Prince George's, in Maryland; on the south-west flows the Potomac, dividing it from Alexandria county, in Virginia — that portion of the District which reverted to the latter state by the act of 1846. The two cities, Washington and Georgetown, are situated respectively on the east and north-east banks of the river, and are connected by two short bridges crossing Rock Creek, a small branch of the Potomac.... The area of the entire District is now estimated at sixty square miles. (Gazetteer of the United States of America, 1854)

Place Unit Type
City or Town
Containing Unit
Date Type
A new Article of War forbids the military to return escaped slaves to their former owners Lawmaking/Litigating
A storm dumps snow over wide areas of the East, from Washington, DC to Boston Crime/Disasters
Abraham Lincoln secretly heads directly to Washington arriving in the early morning hours Campaigns/Elections
Abraham Lincoln takes the oath as the sixteenth President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol Lawmaking/Litigating
Abraham Lincoln visits Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and from there secretly travels directly to Washington Campaigns/Elections
Accused Lincoln conspirator is returned to the United States under arrest for murder. Crime/Disasters
Accused Lincoln conspirator John H. Surratt goes on trial in Washington DC for murder. Crime/Disasters
Admiral Andrew Foote assigned to replace Admiral Dupont as head of South Atlantic Squadron Battles/Soldiers
Admiral Andrew Foote dies after a short illness at the Astor Hotel in New York City Battles/Soldiers
Admiral Dahlgren appointed to replace the ailing Admiral Foote as South Atlantic Squadron commander Battles/Soldiers
After more than three months, the U.S. Senate releases Thaddeus Hyatt from the Washington Jail Lawmaking/Litigating
American Colonization Society holds its forty-third annual meeting in Washington D.C. Cultural
At his Washington D.C. home, General George McClellan snubs the President and Secretary of State Lawmaking/Litigating
- At the Capitol, the trial of Henry Wirz, former Andersonville prison commandant, continues in Washington Crime/Disasters
At the War Department, Secretary Stanton announced large rewards for the capture of the Lincoln conspirators Crime/Disasters
Baltimore Excelsiors defeat Washington Potomacs in first intercity baseball game outside New York City Education/Culture
Baltimore rioters mount a deadly attack on the Sixth Massachusetts in the streets of the city Battles/Soldiers
Brigadier General Charles Pomeroy Stone, USA, arrested in his Washington hotel room and imprisoned Lawmaking/Litigating
Buchanan's Secretary of the Treasury recommends secession to his home state of Georgia Lawmaking/Litigating
- Burton Chauncey Cook serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
Captain Charles Stone takes up his duties at the head of the District of Columbia Militia Battles/Soldiers
Commercial telegraph service inaugurated in Washington, D.C. Business/Industry
Confederate diplomats arrive in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
Confederate diplomats in Washington pass on news of federal military and naval preparations Battles/Soldiers
Congress approves new gold coinage Lawmaking/Litigating
Congress authorizes the three cent silver coin Legal/Political
Congress declares war with Mexico following attacks on US forces in disputed Texas border areas Lawmaking/Litigating
Congress incorporates Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Education/Culture
Congress votes to join with Britain and France on a commission to preserve Atlantic fishing stocks US/the World
Congressman Daniel Sickles is acquitted in his trial for the murder of Philip Barton Key Lawmaking/Litigating
Congressman Daniel Sickles is indicted for murder in Washington D.C. in the shooting of Philip Barton Key Crime/Disasters
Congressman Daniel Sickles of New York murders Philip Barton Key in the street in Washington D.C. Crime/Disasters
Congressman John Sherman urges his brother William to return to Ohio from Louisiana Personal
Daniel Gott of New York introduces his resolution to ban slavery in the District of Columbia Slavery/Abolition
- David Davis serves in the United States Senate Legal/Political
David Farragut becomes the United States Navy's first full Admiral. Battles/Soldiers
- David Wilmot serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
- David Wilmot serves in the United States Senate Personal
Defeated presidential candidate Henry Clay returns to the Senate Legal/Political
Democrat George R. Riddle, one of Delaware's sitting U.S. Senators, dies suddenly in Washington, D.C. Personal
Discovery in Washington D.C. of the plundering of more than $700,000 in Indian Trust Funds Crime/Disasters
Earthquake shakes Virginia, North Carolina, and Ohio Crime/Disasters
Edward Bates resigns as Attorney General Lawmaking/Litigating
- Elihu Washburne serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
Ex-Confederate General George Pickett reaches out to his old West Point friend U.S. Grant for amnesty Crime/Disasters
Federal Income Tax takes effect in the United States Lawmaking/Litigating
Fire at the U.S. Capitol destroys valuable books and artifacts Cultural
First Interior Secretary named Lawmaking/Litigating
First Japanese Ambassador leaves Japan for the United States US/the World
First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States arrives in California US/the World
First Japanese Diplomatic Mission to the United States arrives in Hawaii US/the World
First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States arrives in Panama enroute to Washington, D.C. US/the World
First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States arrives in Washington D.C. US/the World
First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States departs for home from New York City US/the World
First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States departs Hawaii for San Francisco US/the World
- First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States lavishly entertained in New York City US/the World
First Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States visits Baltimore and Philadelphia US/the World
First Japanese Embassy to the United States received officially at the White House US/the World
Former Kansas governor challenges Attorney General of the United States to a duel Crime/Disasters
General George Meade appointed commander of the Army of the Potomac, replacing Joseph Hooker Battles/Soldiers
General Scott gives assurances of a smooth official counting of the Electoral College votes next week Lawmaking/Litigating
General W.T. Sherman, negotiating Confederate surrender in North Carolina, makes a political blunder Battles/Soldiers
General Winfield Scott orders Captain Charles Stone to put the District of Columbia Militia under arms Battles/Soldiers
Godard Bailey, William H. Russell, John B. Floyd indicted over Indian Trust Funds embezzlement Crime/Disasters
Governor Alexander Ramsey makes Minnesota the first state to pledge its militia to the Union Battles/Soldiers
Gustavus Vasa Fox joins the US Navy as acting midshipman Personal
Hannibal Hamlin takes the oath as fifteenth Vice President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol Lawmaking/Litigating
Henry Clay dies in Washington Personal
Henry Wirz, former commandant of the Andersonville prison camp, goes on trial in Washington Crime/Disasters
Henry Wirz, former commandant of the Andersonville prison camp, is executed in Washington, D.C. Crime/Disasters
Historic Japanese Mission meets in Washington, D.C. with the U.S. Secretary of State US/the World
House of Representatives passes resolution to end joint occupation of Oregon Territory Lawmaking/Litigating
House of Representatives passes the Homestead Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
Hugh McCulloch begins service as the first U.S. Comptroller of the Currency Lawmaking/Litigating
In Illinois, the Chicago Times reopens after its brief military shutdown Lawmaking/Litigating
In Maryland, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney dies in office Personal
In Pennsylvania, the Prince of Wales tours the state capitol in Harrisburg US/the World
In Pennsylvania, visitors begin to throng into Gettysburg for the upcoming visit of President Lincoln Education/Culture
In snowy Washington, imprisoned spy Rose Greenhow meets with the Commission on Political Prisoners Battles/Soldiers
In the hotly contested election for Speaker of the House, Thomas Bocock withdraws Lawmaking/Litigating
In the hotly contested Speaker's election, Democrat John Millson of Virginia comes to within eighteen votes of success Lawmaking/Litigating
In the Trent Affair, the British Foreign Secretary demands an apology and release of Mason and Slidell US/the World
In Utah, the telegraph reaches Salt Lake City and Brigham Young sends a message to President Lincoln Science/Technology
In Washington D.C., South Carolinian James Chesnut, Jr. becomes the first Southern senator to resign his seat Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., the second day of the Grand Review sees General Sherman's army parade through the city Battles/Soldiers
In Washington D.C., the second South Carolina senator, James Henry Hammond, resigns his seat Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., thousands watch as the victorious Army of the Potomac parades through the city Battles/Soldiers
In Washington D.C., Union officer and Irish Nationalist leader Michael Corcoran dies in a fall Personal
In Washington DC, President and Mrs. Lincoln attend an evening of Verdi and Bellini opera Education/Culture
In Washington DC, President Buchanan meets with the South Carolina congressional delegation Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 26th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 27th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 29th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 30th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, the 31st Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, the 32nd Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, the 33rd Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, two French princes join the Union Army on the staff of General McClellan Battles/Soldiers
In Washington, a major military reorganization divides the nation into five large military districts Battles/Soldiers
In Washington, D.C., Mary Harris goes on trial for the sensational murder of her former lover at the Treasury building Crime/Disasters
In Washington, D.C., oppressive heat is reported, along with thunderstorms Science/Technology
In Washington, DC, a disastrous fire kills hundreds of horses at a government livery stables Crime/Disasters
In Washington, DC, Confederate diplomats request a meeting with the U.S. Secretary of State Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, DC, the 41st Congress of the United States ends its first session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 41st Congress of the United States opens its second session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 42nd Congress ends its first session. Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 42nd Congress ends its third session and finishes its term Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 42nd Congress of the United States ends its second session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 43rd Congress ends its second session and finishes its term Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 43rd Congress of the United States ends its first session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 44th Congress ends its first session Legal/Political
In Washington, government figures state that the U.S. national debt is approaching three billion dollars Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, John Wilkes Booth's accused fellow plotters are transferred to the Old Penitentiary for trial Crime/Disasters
In Washington, Mary Harris is acquitted of murder by reason of temporary insanity after a sensational trial Crime/Disasters
In Washington, membership of the military court for John Wilkes Booth's accused fellow plotters is adjusted Crime/Disasters
In Washington, Secretary of State Seward is injured quite badly when thrown from his carriage Crime/Disasters
In Washington, six-month government figures indicate an hundred million dollar decline in the U.S. national debt Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the capital's Catholic congregations donate in aid of the Pope and his troubles in Italy Religion/Philosophy
In Washington, the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War meets for the first time Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the officers of the military court for John Wilkes Booth's accused fellow plotters are named Crime/Disasters
In Washington, the Senate votes to strike down the color bar on railroad cars in the District of Columbia Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. Court of Claims opens a new session Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. House of Representatives votes for a Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. Senate votes 33 to 3 to set up the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, trade negotiations between Canada and Congress break up without agreement US/the World
Isaac Newton, the first commissioner of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, dies in office. Personal
Jacob Thompson of Mississippi resigns as the Buchanan Administration's Secretary of the Interior Lawmaking/Litigating
James Buchanan accepts position of Secretary of State Lawmaking/Litigating
- John Courts Bagby serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
- John McAuley Palmer serves in the United States Senate Legal/Political
John Ross, for thirty-eight years Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, dies in Washington, D.C. Personal
- John Wentworth serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
- John Wentworth serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
José Marta Mata presents his credentials in Washington as minister from the recently recognized Juarez government of Mexico Legal/Political
Joseph E. Johnston appointed Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army Battles/Soldiers
Joseph Gales, Jr., publisher of the National Intelligencer for fifty years, dies in Washington, DC Personal
Joseph Holt confirmed as new Postmaster-General in the Buchanan Cabinet Lawmaking/Litigating
Josiah James Evans, Senator from South Carolina, dies in office in Washington, D.C. Personal
Judges appointed for the new U.S. Court of Claims Lawmaking/Litigating
Julia Jayne Trumbull dies in Washington, DC Personal
Julia Ward Howe composes the verses that will become the words to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" Education/Culture
Justice Robert Grier issues opinion in the Prize Cases Legal/Political
Lewis Powell attempts to assassinate Secretary of State William Seward in Washington, DC Crime/Disasters
Lieutenant General Winfield Scott retires from the Army after fifty-three years service, twenty as general-in-chief Personal
Lord Lyons, the new British Ambassador, presents his credentials to President Buchanan in Washington Legal/Political
- Lyman Trumbull serves in the United States Senate Legal/Political
Major General George B. McClellan is appointed general-in-chief of the U.S. Army, replacing Winfield Scott Battles/Soldiers
Mary Surratt and Lewis Powell are arrested in a late night War Department raid on Surratt's boarding house Crime/Disasters
Marylander Philip F. Thomas resigns after one month as Secretary of the Treasury Lawmaking/Litigating
Meeting in Washington DC demands protection for black Union prisoners of war Battles/Soldiers
Members of the House of Representatives meet to elect a Speaker Lawmaking/Litigating
Mission of Confederate Vice-President Stephens seeks negotiations on prisoners Lawmaking/Litigating
Moncure Conway liberates his father's slaves Personal
- Moncure Conway serves as minister at Unitarian Church in Washington, D.C. Slavery/Abolition
More than a hundred general officers of volunteers are mustered out of the Union Army Battles/Soldiers
Nathan Clifford of Maine begins his service as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Lawmaking/Litigating
New federal Agricultural Bureau head sworn in Lawmaking/Litigating
New railroad bridge across the Susquehanna speeds up the journey from Philadelphia to Washington, DC. Business/Industry
On an unseasonably warm day, the 39th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
On E Street in the capital, the Washington Infirmary, now a military hospital, burns to the ground Crime/Disasters
- Orville Hickman Browning serves in the United States Senate Legal/Political
Outgoing president James Buchanan leaves Washington for his home in Lancaster, Pennsylvania Personal
Outside the White House, thousands of Democrats hear President Buchanan speak in favor of Breckinridge Campaigns/Elections
Philip Francis Thomas of Maryland becomes Secretary of the Treasury, replacing Howell Cobb Lawmaking/Litigating
Philip Johnson, sitting Pennsylvania Democratic congressman dies suddenly in Washington, D.C. Personal
Postmaster-General Holt threatens action over South Carolina's seizure of U.S. Post Office accounts Lawmaking/Litigating
Postmaster-General William Dennison resigns from the Johnson Cabinet over policy differences. Lawmaking/Litigating
President Abraham Lincoln calls a special early session of the new 37th Congress Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan asks Congress for funding to transport rescued African slaves to Liberia Slavery/Abolition
President Buchanan hosts the visiting Japanese diplomats at an official dinner US/the World
President Buchanan invites the Prince of Wales to visit the United States US/the World
President Buchanan rejects Virginia's call for federal forces to police neighboring states Legal/Political
President Buchanan replies to the South Carolina's commissioners as "private gentlemen" Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan sends his annual message to the United States Senate Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan signs the bill to admit free Kansas as the 34th state of the Union Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan signs the Colorado Territory into existence Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan signs the Nevada Territory into existence Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan vetoes bill donating public lands to support state colleges Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan vetoes the Homestead Bill of 1860 Lawmaking/Litigating
President Johnson dismisses his critic, Jane Grey Swisshelm, from her War Department job Lawmaking/Litigating
President Johnson's Secretary of the Interior, James Harlan of Iowa, resigns. Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln banishes Congressman Clement Vallandigham to the Confederacy Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln declares void Union General David Hunter's South Carolina declaration of emancipation Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln dies from the head wound John Wilkes Booth inflicted eight hours before Crime/Disasters
President Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863 Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln leaves Washington for Gettysburg and the dedication of the new National Cemetery Education/Culture
President Lincoln meets with Chicago attorney William Danenhower Personal
President Lincoln names Andrew Johnson the military governor of Tennessee Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln rejects Confederate Vice-President Stephens' offer to negotiate on prisoners Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln signs the First Confiscation Act authorizing the seizure of slaves aiding the Confederacy Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln signs the Homestead Act Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln signs the Second Confiscation Act authorizing freedom for confiscated slaves Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln, with great ceremony, visits aboard a French frigate at the Washington Navy Yard US/the World
President William Henry Harrison calls a special early session of the 27th Congress in Washington, DC Legal/Political
President-Elect Lincoln selects Senator Simon Cameron as his Secretary of War Lawmaking/Litigating
Preston Brooks dies suddenly in Washington, D.C. Personal
Rabbi gives opening prayer in the House of Representatives for the first time Religion/Philosophy
Reading, Pennsylvania militia artillery unit called to service arrives in Harrisburg Battles/Soldiers
Regional army commander Ambrose Burnside orders the closing of the Chicago Times for disloyalty Lawmaking/Litigating
Representative Brooks attacks Senator Sumner in the Senate chamber Legal/Political
Republicans replace John Sherman with William Pennington in the Speaker's election struggle Lawmaking/Litigating
Salmon P. Chase resigns as Secretary of the Treasury Lawmaking/Litigating
- Second session of the 38th Congress sitting in Washington DC from early January to early March, 1865 Legal/Political
Secretary of State Lewis Cass resigns over the non-reinforcement of federal forts in South Carolina Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of State Seward refuses to recognize the Confederate diplomats sent to Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of State Seward urges Great Lakes governors to fortify their lakeside ports against foreign threats Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of the Treasury Howell Cobb resigns from the Buchanan Cabinet Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of War Cameron outlines his quotas of volunteers to state governors Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of War E.M. Stanton orders appointment of Union commissioners to visit Southern prisons Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of War Edwin Stanton appoints a special commission to investigate fraud in Army contracts Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of War Holt dismisses General Twiggs from the U.S. Army for treachery Battles/Soldiers
Secretary of War John B. Floyd of Virginia resigns and is replaced by Postmaster-General Joseph Holt Lawmaking/Litigating
Secretary of War Simon Cameron resigns and is appointed minister to Russia Lawmaking/Litigating
Senate Committee investigating Harpers Ferry issues warrant for arrest of Frank Sanborn Lawmaking/Litigating
Senator Benjamin Fitzpatrick of Alabama declines the Democratic nomination for vice president Campaigns/Elections
Senator Thomas Hart Benton, "Old Bullion," dies of cancer in Washington, D.C. Personal
Senatorial caucus meets to discuss Cabinet crisis Lawmaking/Litigating
Several Native American leaders of Far West tribes leave San Francisco for a trip to the East Lawmaking/Litigating
Shelby Moore Cullom dies in Washington, DC Personal
- Shelby Moore Cullom serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
- Shelby Moore Cullom serves in the United States Senate Legal/Political
Sir Frederick Bruce, British ambassador in Washington, dies suddenly in Boston, Massachusetts. Personal
Sitting Senator Solomon Foot of Vermont dies at sixty-three years old in his residence in Washington D.C. Personal
South Carolina's commissioners to the United States arrive and take up residence in Washington Lawmaking/Litigating
South Carolina's commissioners to the United States present their credentials and explain their mission Lawmaking/Litigating
Southern senators and congressmen meet in Washington and produce the "Southern Manifesto" Lawmaking/Litigating
Spencer Fullerton Baird is appointed assistant secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Education/Culture
Spencer Fullerton Baird is appointed secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC Education/Culture
Statue of Andrew Jackson unveiled in Washington, D.C. Cultural
Stephen Douglas makes his formal acceptance of his nomination for President of the United States Campaigns/Elections
Stephen Douglas marries Adele Cutts in Washington, DC Personal
Strong winds damage buildings in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and New York City Crime/Disasters
Supreme Court finds in favor of The Schooner Amistad Legal/Political
Supreme Court issues ruling in Dred Scott Case Slavery/Abolition
Thaddeus Hyatt arrives in Washington but defies the Senate Harpers Ferry Committee Legal/Political
The "lame duck" second session of the 43rd Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The "lame duck" third session of the 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 26th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 26th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1839 to mid-July, 1840 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 27th Congress ends its early first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 27th Congress ends its second session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 27th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from late May, 1841 till mid-September, 1841 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 27th Congress opens early, in special session, in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 28th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 28th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1843 till mid-June, 1844 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 28th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 29th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 29th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1845 till mid-August, 1846 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 29th Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 30th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 30th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1847 till mid-August, 1848 Legal/Political
The 30th Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 31st Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 31st Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1849 till late September, 1850 Legal/Political
The 31st Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 32nd Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 32nd Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1851 till late August, 1852 Legal/Political
The 32nd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 33rd Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 33rd Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1853 till early August, 1854 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 33rd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 34th Congress begins a ten day special session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 34th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 34th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1855 till mid-August, 1857 Legal/Political
The 34th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 35th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC. and adjourns until December Legal/Political
The 35th Congress goes into a ten-day recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 35th Congress is in a ten-day holiday recess until January 5, 1858 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 35th Congress is in session in Washington, DC during December, 1857 before its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The 35th Congress is in session in Washington, DC. from early January to mid-June, 1858 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 35th Congress of the United States ends its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
The 35th Congress opens in Washington, DC with James Orr of South Carolina elected as Speaker Lawmaking/Litigating
The 35th Congress returns from its ten day holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
The 36th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC and adjourns until December Lawmaking/Litigating
The 36th Congress of the United States ends its second session, finishes its term, and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
The 36th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 36th U.S. Congress is in session in Washington, D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
The 37th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Legal/Political
- The 37th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early July, 1861 till early August, 1861 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 37th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 38th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 38th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 39th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Legal/Political
The 41st Congress of the United States comes to the end of its term in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 41st Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 20, 1872 and January 6, 1873 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 21, 1871 and January 8, 1872 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is in session in Washington, DC between early January and mid-June, 1872 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in its third session in Washington, DC between early January and early March, 1873 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC before its holiday recess which begins on December 20, 1872 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC before its holiday recess which begins on December 21, 1871 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early March and mid-April, 1871 Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress opens its "lame duck" third session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress opens its second session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 20, 1873 and January 5, 1874 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is in its second session in Washington, DC, before its holiday recess that begins December 23, 1874 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is in session in Washington, DC between early January and mid-June, 1874 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is sitting in its second session in Washington, DC between early January and early March, 1875 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC before its holiday recess which begins on December 20, 1873 Legal/Political
The 43rd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 43rd Congress opens its second session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 43rd Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
The 44th Congress ends its second session and finishes its term in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is in its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is in session in Washington, DC between early January and mid-August, 1876 Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is sitting in its second session in Washington, DC between early December, 1876 and early March, 1877 Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 44th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 44th Congress opens its second session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 44th Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
The 45th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Legal/Political
The 45th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 46th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The American Colonization Society holds its forty-ninth annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Campaigns/Elections
The Army creates the Bureau of Colored Troops to oversee the creation of African-American regiments Battles/Soldiers
The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad opens service for the first time in a year Business/Industry
The breaking up of the ice dams on the Potomac carries away Washington, D.C.'s Long Bridge. Crime/Disasters
- The Dred Scott Case is debated before the United States Supreme Court Legal/Political
The early first session of the 37th Congress ends in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The first Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States departs San Francisco for Panama US/the World
- The first Japanese diplomatic mission to the United States hosted in San Francisco US/the World
The first session of the 38th Congress adjourns for a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 38th Congress ends in Washington DC Legal/Political
- The first session of the 38th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 6, 1864 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The first session of the 38th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to early July, 1864 Legal/Political
- The first session of the 38th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 38th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 39th Congress adjourns for a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
The first session of the 39th Congress ends in Washington DC Legal/Political
- The first session of the 39th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 5, 1866 Legal/Political
- The first session of the 39th Congress is sitting at the capital from December 4 to December 21, 1865 Legal/Political
- The first session of the 39th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to late July, 1866 Legal/Political
The first session of the 39th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
The first session of the 45th Congress closes in Washington, DC and the second session opens the same day Legal/Political
- The first session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The first session of the 46th Congress ends in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The first session of the 46th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between mid-March and the end of June, 1879 Lawmaking/Litigating
The first telegraphed news bulletin relays the results of the Oregon question debate to Baltimore Science/Technology
- The Fortieth Congress is in recess from its first session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is in recess from its first session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is sitting and closing out its first session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is sitting in its first meeting of its second session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is sitting in its first term in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The Freedmen's Bureau halts the free issue of rations to refugees and freedmen across the South. Lawmaking/Litigating
The Governor of Pennsylvania misses his connection with the President at Hanover Junction Education/Culture
The Homestead Act comes into effect Lawmaking/Litigating
The Homestead Bill of 1860 passes both houses and is sent to the President for signature Lawmaking/Litigating
- The House and the Senate are both sitting in a special session that will last till the end of the month Legal/Political
The House of Representatives meets for the first time in its new chamber in the United States Capitol Legal/Political
The Interior Department created Lawmaking/Litigating
The International Ocean Telegraph Company is formed to extend telegraph lines into Central American and the Caribbean. Business/Industry
The Louisiana pianist Louis Gottschalk plays for General Grant at a gala concert in Grover's Hotel. Education/Culture
The Louisiana pianist Louis Gottschalk plays for President Lincoln at a concert in Willard's Hotel. Education/Culture
- The murder trial of Congressman Daniel Sickles of New York continues in Washington D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
- The murder trial of Congressman Daniel Sickles of New York continues in Washington D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
- The National Convention of Colored Men meets for three days in Washington, D.C. Campaigns/Elections
The National Deaf Mute College is chartered in Washington, D.C. Cultural
The National Medical Association holds it annual meeting in Washington D.C. Education/Culture
The National Teacher's Association are meeting for their annual conference in Washington, DC Education/Culture
The position of Comptroller of the Currency is authorized Lawmaking/Litigating
The presidential election becomes official with the announcement from the Electoral College Campaigns/Elections
The public sees for the first time the series of orders by which President Lincoln took full command of the war Battles/Soldiers
The Registered Letter authorized Commercial
The regular second session of the 34th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second hanging of an Army of the Potomac soldier takes place north of Washington DC Crime/Disasters
- The second regular session of the 34th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December and early March Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 26th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1840 and early March, 1841 Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 26th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 27th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1841 and late August, 1842 Legal/Political
The second session of the 27th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 28th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 29th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1846 and early March, 1847 Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 29th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 30th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 30th Congress sits in Washington, DC between early December, 1848 and early March, 1849 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 31st Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1850 and early March, 1851 Legal/Political
The second session of the 31st Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 32nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1852 and early March, 1853 Legal/Political
The second session of the 32nd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 33rd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December and early March Legal/Political
The second session of the 33rd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 35th Congress adjourns for its ten day holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 35th Congress is in its ten day holiday recess until January 5, 1859 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 35th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 35th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 35th Congress returns from its ten day holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 35th U.S. Congress is sitting between early January and early March, 1859 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 36th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 36th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 37th Congress ends in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 37th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 37th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 38th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 6, 1865 Legal/Political
The second session of the 38th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 38th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
- The second session of the 39th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 4, 1867 Legal/Political
- The second session of the 39th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to early March. Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 39th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 39th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 39th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States comes to an end in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States is in its eighteen day holiday recess Legal/Political
- The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States is meeting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The second session of the 43rd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 23, 1874 and January 5, 1875 Legal/Political
The second session of the 45th Congress breaks for the holiday season Legal/Political
The second session of the 45th Congress closes in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 45th Congress is in its traditional holiday recess till January 11, 1878 Legal/Political
- The second session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC from early January to mid-June, 1878 Legal/Political
The second session of the 45th Congress returns from its holiday season recess Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress breaks for the holiday season Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress ends in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 46th Congress is in its traditional holiday recess till January 7, 1880 Legal/Political
- The second session of the 46th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 46th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC from early January to mid-June, 1880 Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress resumes in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The Senate of the United States ends its ten day special session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The Senate of the United States ends its week long special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a ten day special session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a three day special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a two day special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a week long special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The Senate of the United States opens a week long special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The special session of both houses of Congress adjourns in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The submarine cable between Punta Rassa and Key West completes the Washington to Havana telegraph line. Business/Industry
- The third session of the 27th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1842 and early March, 1843 Legal/Political
The third session of the 27th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 37th Congress adjourns for a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 37th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 6, 1863 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 37th Congress is sitting in Washington DC until early March 1863 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 37th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between December 1 and December 22, 1862 Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 37th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 37th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States is in its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The third session of the 45th Congress in Washington DC is in its two week holiday recesss Legal/Political
The third session of the 45th Congress in Washington DC returns from its two week holiday recesss Legal/Political
- The third session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to early March, 1879 Legal/Political
- The third session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 45th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 46th Congress begins its holiday recess in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The third session of the 46th Congress begins its holiday recess in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 46th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The Thirteenth Amendment outlawing slavery is announced as now the law of the land. Lawmaking/Litigating
The thirty-fourth ballot in the election for Speaker of the House ends without a resolution Lawmaking/Litigating
The three dollar gold piece is authorised Commercial
The trial of Congressman Daniel Sickles for the murder of Philip Barton Key begins in Washington D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
- The trial of Daniel Sickles for the murder of Philip Barton Key continues in Washington D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
The trial of Daniel Sickles for the murder of Philip Barton Key continues in Washington D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Congress reverses the Gott Resolution to ban slavery in the District of Columbia Slavery/Abolition
The U.S. Government counts only eighteen veterans remaining from the Revolutionary War Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate imprisons Thaddeus Hyatt for failure to appear before Harpers Ferry Committee Legal/Political
The U.S. Senate orders arrest of Thaddeus Hyatt for failure to appear before Harpers Ferry Committee Legal/Political
The U.S. Senate passes its version of the Homestead Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate, sitting in extraordinary session, confirms all of President Lincoln's cabinet choices Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Supreme Court rejects Georgia's challenge to the Military Reconstruction Acts. Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Supreme Court rejects Mississippi's challenge to the Military Reconstruction Acts. Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States appoints its first entomologist Legal/Political
The United States Army abolishes flogging as a punishment Battles/Soldiers
The United States becomes the second nation state to recognize the new united Kingdom of Italy Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States establishes a Court of Claims Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States reclassifies convicted Confederate privateers as prisoners of war Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States releases the Confederate commissioners Mason and Slidell into British custody US/the World
- The United States Senate is sitting in special session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States Senate occupies its new chamber at the Capitol Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States Supreme Court finishes its 1859-1860 session Lawmaking/Litigating
The War Department bars the enlistment of men under eighteen without parental approval Lawmaking/Litigating
The War Department decides that Generals Fremont and McClellan outrank General Benjamin Butler Lawmaking/Litigating
The War Department reopens military recruitment across the North Battles/Soldiers
The War Department suspends military recruitment across the North Battles/Soldiers
The War Department takes over all telegraph communication in the United States Lawmaking/Litigating
The Washington Observatory observes a new variable star flaring in the Coronae Borealis Science/Technology
- The Washington Peace Conference is meeting at Willard's Hotel in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The Washington Peace Conference presents its proposals to the U.S. Congress Lawmaking/Litigating
The Wills family hosts President Lincoln for the night in Gettysburg Education/Culture
Thirty-ninth ballot in the election for Speaker sees John Sherman fall behind for the first time Lawmaking/Litigating
Thirty-three year old war artist W.T. Crane dies in Washington D.C. of a disease of the throat Personal
- Thomas Langrell Harris serves in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
Thousands of African-American citizens in Washington D.C. celebrate the anniversary of their emancipation Slavery/Abolition
Three new federal army departments are formed Battles/Soldiers
Treasury Secretary Dix issues his order to "shoot on the spot" anyone hauling down the national flag Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Army Signal Corps established Battles/Soldiers
U.S. Government contracts with American Colonization Society to transport rescued African slaves to Liberia Slavery/Abolition
U.S. Government takes over the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Delaware Railroad Battles/Soldiers
U.S. Navy Secretary Gideon Welles authorizes the enlistment of runaway slaves into the naval service Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Postmaster-General Aaron V. Brown dies in office in Washington, DC Personal
Ulysses Grant takes the oath as the eighteenth President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC Campaigns/Elections
Ulysses Simpson Grant is formally named commander of all Union Armies, with rank of Lieutenant-General Battles/Soldiers
Uncomfortable with President Johnson's policies, U.S. Attorney General James Speed resigns. Lawmaking/Litigating
Union cavalry General George Custer leads a delegation to present captured battle-flags to the War Department Battles/Soldiers
Union General Philip Sheridan calls the mayor of New Orleans "a bad man" and recommends his removal. Battles/Soldiers
Union officer and Irish Nationalist leader Michael Corcoran is buried in New York City Personal
Union telegrapher dies in a Washington DC hospital of wounds from a booby-trap left in Yorktown Battles/Soldiers
United States Army reports its strength as 17,036 officers and men in nineteen regiments Legal/Political
United States copyright law for photographs passes Lawmaking/Litigating
United States copyright law for photographs signed into law Lawmaking/Litigating
United States Senate confirms Robert Grier's appointment to the Supreme Court Lawmaking/Litigating
United States signs a commercial treaty with Belgium in Washington, D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
Verses of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" published anonymously in the Atlantic Monthly Education/Culture
Vice-President Andrew Johnson takes the oath as seventeenth President of the United States Legal/Political
Visiting Japanese diplomats tour the Washington Naval Yard US/the World
War Department renames the forts defending Washington DC to honor senior officers killed in the war Battles/Soldiers
War Department sets generous cash bounties for veterans who reenlist in the Union Army Lawmaking/Litigating
Washington pays Governor Pickens what he is owed, from the newly seized Charleston Sub-Treasury Lawmaking/Litigating
Washington society hosts a ball in honor of Lord Napier, the retiring British Ambassador Cultural
William Danenhower dies in Washington, DC Personal
William H. Russell arrested in New York City for plundering more than $800,000 in Indian Trust Funds Crime/Disasters
William Pennington of New Jersey elected Speaker of the House on the forty-fourth ballot Lawmaking/Litigating
With African-Americans voting in large numbers, Republican make sweeping gains in the Washington D.C. municipal elections. Campaigns/Elections
With the end of its second regular session, the 34th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
Without authority, Union General David Hunter declares all slaves in three states "forever free" Lawmaking/Litigating
Date Title
Abraham Lincoln to John Stuart, January 23, 1841
Debate Over Increase of the Army, House of Representatives, January 9, 1847
Abraham Lincoln to Mary Todd Lincoln, Washington, DC, April 16, 1848
Abraham Lincoln to William Herndon, June 12, 1848
Abraham Lincoln to William Herndon, Washington, DC, July 10, 1848
Abraham Lincoln to Thaddeus Stevens, September 3, 1848
Abraham Lincoln to John D. Johnston, December 24, 1848
Abraham Lincoln, Application for Patent on an Improved Method of Lifting Vessels over Shoals, March 10, 1849
Abraham Lincoln to J. R. Underwood, June 3, 1849
Abraham Lincoln to John M. Clayton, July 28, 1849
New York Herald, “Mr. Clay's Compromise, and the Cabinet,” February 1, 1850
(Columbus) Ohio State Journal, “New Law about Fugitive Slaves,” April 30, 1850
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, June 22, 1854
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, June 27, 1854
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, October 3, 1854
Abraham Lincoln to Elihu Benjamin Washburne, February 9, 1855
Abraham Lincoln to Jesse Olds Norton, February 16 1855
New York Herald, “The Kansas Question and the Anti-Slavery Disorganizers,” May 15, 1855
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, September 9, 1855
Louisville (KY) Journal, "Untitled," September 29, 1855
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, October 6, 1855
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, October 12, 1855
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, November 10, 1855
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, November 26, 1855
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, April 3, 1856
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, April 23, 1856
Hiram Wilson to William Still, September 15, 1856
Jermain Wesley Loguen to William Still, October 5, 1856
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, December 9, 1856
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Future Judged by the Past," January 1, 1857
Richmond (VA) Dispatch, "A Case in Point," January 3, 1857
New York Times, "The Dred Scott Case," January 5, 1857
James Buchanan to Harriet Lane, January 25, 1857
Entry by Josiah Gorgas, January 28, 1857
New York Times, “Gen. Scott and the Secretary of War,” February 5, 1857
New York Times, “Affairs in Kansas,” February 9, 1857
New York Times, "The Joint Committee to Notify the President and Vice-President Elect," February 14, 1857
New York Times, "Cabinet Rumors at Washington," February 20, 1857
Robert Cooper Grier to James Buchanan, February 23, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Affairs in Kansas,” March 5, 1857
Boston (MA) Herald, “The Dred Scott Decision,” March 7, 1857
New York Times, “Slavery in the Territories,” March 7, 1857
Boston (MA) Herald, “The Dred Scott Case,” March 9, 1857
New York Herald, "The Decision in the Dred Scott," March 9, 1857
New York Times, "From Washington," March 9, 1857
New York Herald, “The New Order of Battle,” March 13, 1857
New York Times, “Governor Geary’s Last Interview with Mr. Buchanan,” March 28, 1857
New York Times, “Robert J. Walker’s Acceptance of the Governship of Kansas,” April 1, 1857
New York National Anti-Slavery Standard, "The Chief Justice Insane!," April 11, 1857
New York Times, “England and America,” April 29, 1857
New York Times, “Kansas Politics,” May 4, 1857
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Fate and the Folly of Compromises," May 25, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Administration," June 25, 1857
E. L. Stevens to William Still, July 8, 1857
Jacob Bigelow (William Penn) to William Still, July 12, 1857
E. L. Stevens to William Still, July 13, 1857
James Buchanan to Lord Clarendon, September 9, 1857
Earro Weems to William Still, September 19, 1857
New York Times, “Gen. Walker’s Letter,” September 23, 1857
New York Times, “The Fall Elections,” October 17, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Collapse of Abolitionists,” October 22, 1857
James Buchanan to Lewis Cass, October 24, 1857
New York Times, “The Ballot-Box and the Bayonet,” October 30, 1857
John H. Dade to William Still, November 1, 1857
Stephen A. Douglas to John A. McClernand, November 23, 1857
Cumberland (MD) Democratic Allegiance, "The Mormon War," November 28, 1857
New York Times, "The Missing Walker," December 14, 1857
New York Times, “Governor Walker in Washington,” December 15, 1857
New York Times, “Secretary Stanton’s Call for an Extra Session of the Kansas Legislature,” December 17, 1857
Abraham Lincoln to Lyman Trumbull, December 18, 1857
New York Times, “Opening of the Presidential Campaign of 1860,” December 23, 1857
Abraham Lincoln to Lyman Trumbull, December 28, 1857
New York Herald, “News from Kansas,” December 30, 1857
New York Herald, "The Kansas Trouble in Congress," January 3, 1858
Lyman Trumbull to Abraham Lincoln, January 3, 1858
New York Herald, "Kansas," January 4, 1858
New York Herald, "The Slavery Question in Congress," January 5, 1858
(Concord) New Hampshire Statesman, “Douglas in the Senate,” March 6, 1858
Israel Washburn to James Shepard Pike, March 16, 1858
Israel Washburn to James Shepard Pike, March 20, 1858
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Result in the House," April 7, 1858
John Wentworth to Abraham Lincoln, April 19, 1858
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Rejection of Kansas," April 26, 1858
New York Times, “The People’s Party,” June 2, 1858
New York Times, “Senator Douglas and the Republicans of Illinois,” June 8, 1858
New York Times, "Private Armed Vessels," June 8, 1858
Lyman Trumbull to Abraham Lincoln, June 12, 1858
Lyman Trumbull to Abraham Lincoln, June 16, 1858
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Rumored Breaking Up of the Cabinet,” June 18, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "More Fighting and More Drains upon the Treasury," July 5, 1858
Ezra L. Stevens to William Still, July 11, 1858
New York Herald, "Lecompton to be Rejected," July 26, 1858
John Jordan Crittenden to Abraham Lincoln, July 29, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Signs of Fright,” August 20, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “A Faithful Witness,” August 27, 1858
New York Herald, “No Quarter to Douglas,” August 30, 1858
New York Times, “What will Kansas do Next?,” August 31, 1858
New York Times, “Mr. Buchanan’s Troubles,” October 1, 1858
New York Times, "The Illinois Election," November 5, 1858
New York Herald, “Gen. Walker Submitting to a ‘Legal Experiment,’” November 19, 1858
(St. Louis) Missouri Republican, “Judge Douglas,” November 25, 1858
New York Herald, “Mr. Douglas On His Travels,” November 28, 1858
New York Times, “From Kansas and Pikes Peak,” December 15, 1858
New York Times, “The Amistad Case,” December 17, 1858
New York Times, “Who is President of Mexico?,” December 22, 1858
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Political Meeting,” December 24, 1858
New York Times, “Douglas and the Democracy,” December 25, 1858
(St. Louis) Missouri Republican, “Senator Douglas,” December 31, 1858
New York Times, “Arrival of Senator Douglas in Philadelphia,” January 4, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Douglas Reception at Washington,” January 11, 1859
New York Herald, “The Present Congress and the Next President,” January 17, 1859
Memphis (TN) Appeal, “The Chicago Times, Senator Douglas and the Administration,” January 18, 1859
New York Herald, “Some of Our Diplomatic and Consular Deficiencies,” January 19, 1859
Memphis (TN) Appeal, “President Buchanan against the Pension Bill,” January 23, 1859
New York Herald, “Forney on a Short Allowance,” January 23, 1859
New York Herald, “The Presidential Question,” January 24, 1859
New York Herald, “The Case of Douglas vs. Fitch," January 25, 1859
New York Herald, “Sham Retrenchment,” January 27, 1859
New York Herald, “The Tarff Question in Congress,” January 28, 1859
New York Times, “The Killing of the Pacific Railroad,” January 29, 1859
Lewis Burrell to William Still, February 2, 1859
New York Times, "Mexican News," February 5, 1859
New Orleans (LA) Picayune, “Letter from Washington,” February 6, 1859
New York Times, "News By Telegraph," February 21, 1859
New York Times, “The Mint,” February 24, 1859
New York Times, “The Political Future,” February 26, 1859
Newark (OH) Advocate, “The Late Domestic Tragedy in Washington,” March 2, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Br. [Mr.] Buchanan and the Democratic Party,” March 7, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “The Union of the South,” March 9, 1859
New York Herald, “The Sickles Tragedy,” March 12, 1859
New York Times, “The President and the Democracy,” March 15, 1859
New York Times, “More Washington Monument,” March 25, 1859
New York Times, "Interesting from Washington," April 12, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “The Douglas Organ on Slavery Extension,” April 14, 1859
James Buchanan to Charles E. Wentz, April 22, 1859
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “Democratic Movements,” May 10, 1859
James Buchanan to Harriet Rebecca Lane, May 14, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Visit of the President to North Carolina,” May 19, 1859
New York Times, “Making Too Much Haste,” May 21, 1859
New York Herald, “Does Mr. Crittenden Back Out?,” May 22, 1859
New York Times, “Post Office Peculation,” June 2, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Republicanism in Virginia,” June 7, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Fugitive Slave,” June 23, 1859
New York Times, “A Fugitive Slave Case in Washington,” June 25, 1859
New York Times, “Arrest for the Abduction of Slave,” June 27, 1859
Bangor (ME) Whig and Courier, “The Douglas Manifesto,” July 4, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Probably Fatal Illness of Secretary Floyd,” July 6, 1859
New York Times, “A Democratic Dove from Georgia,” July 16, 1859
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “Stage-Coach Travel Forty Years Ago,” July 22, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Folly,” July 25, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Another Cargo of 600 Slaves Landed at the South,” August 9, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Change in the Cabinet,” August 22, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Presidential,” August 30, 1859
New York Times, “The Presidential Malaprop,” September 7, 1859
New York Times, “Breaking Up Rapidly,” September 12, 1859
New York Herald, “The Chevalier Forney Slackening Fire,” October 2, 1859
New York Times, “Suspicious,” October 8, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Senator Broderick Killed in a Duel,” October 10, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “The Speakership,” October 12, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “The Charleston Convention,” October 15, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Riot at Harper’s Ferry,” October 18, 1859
New York Times, "News of the Day," October 18, 1859
Carlisle (PA) American Volunteer, “Negro Insurrection!," October 20, 1859
New York Times, “Latest Dispatches,” October 21, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "Dissolution of the Union," October 25, 1859
Baltimore (MD) Sun, "More Harper's Ferry Disclosures," October 28, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "The Virginia Panic," November 19, 1859
Lyman Trumbull to Abraham Lincoln, November 28, 1859
New York Herald, “The South and Southern Safety,” December 4, 1859
San Francisco (CA) Bulletin, “Organization of the United States House of Representatives,” December 7, 1859
New York Herald, "The Slavery Agitation," December 10, 1859
New York Herald, “Judge Douglas and the Administration,” December 11, 1859
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “The Admission of Kansas,” December 17, 1859
New York Herald, “The New York Herald in the South,” December 18, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “The President’s Message,” December 28, 1859
New York Times, “The Trial of Stevens,” January 4, 1860
Boston (MA) Herald, “Telegraph to the Herald,” January 24, 1860
Charleston (SC) Courier, “The Probable Southern Candidate,” January 26, 1860
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Harper’s Ferry Items,” January 30, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Election of Mr. Forney,” February 4, 1860
New York Herald, “A Competent Witness in the John Brown Investigation,” February 5, 1860
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “Thaddeus Hyatt,” February 11, 1860
New York Times, “The Senatorial Inquisition,” February 11, 1860
New York Times, “The Post-Office and the Express,” February 13, 1860
New York Times, “Manufacturing Martyrs,” February 16, 1860
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “The Power to Compel Witnesses,” February 24, 1860
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “The Senate’s Inquisition,” February 24, 1860
New York Herald, “The Senate and Messrs Hyatt and Howe,” February 25, 1860
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “Mr. Hyatt’s Case,” February 29, 1860
New York Times, “Helper’s Book and the Republicans,” March 2, 1860
(Jackson) Mississippian, “Republicanism Defined,” March 6, 1860
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “The Troubles in Texas,” March 13, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “A Pair of Smart Politicians,” March 14, 1860
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Kellogg on Douglas,” March 17, 1860
Charles Linsley to Robert Hunter, March 26, 1860
Asa Biggs to Robert Hunter, March 27, 1860
Thomas L. Kane to Robert Hunter, March 30, 1860
New York Herald, “Seward’s Opinion on the Mexican Business,” April 1, 1860
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “The Coming Men,” April 17, 1860
New York Herald, “Corruption in the United States Marshal’s Office,” May 6, 1860
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “The Great Mistake of the Buchanan’s Administration,” May 15, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Lincoln as He Is,” May 23, 1860
New York Times, “Civilization and the Japanese,” May 26, 1860
Schuyler Colfax to Abraham Lincoln, May 30, 1860
Abraham Lincoln, Autobiography, circa June 1860
(Jackson) Mississippian, “Bell on Abolition Petitions,” June 6, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Sumner’s Speech,” June 8, 1860
Stephen A. Douglas to Follett Foster & Company, June 9, 1860
Richard W. Thompson to Abraham Lincoln, June 12, 1860
George Ashmun to Abraham Lincoln, June 18, 1860
Ripley (OH) Bee, “The John Brown Investigation,” July 5, 1860
Richard W. Thompson to Abraham Lincoln, July 6, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “A Political Dodge,” July 10, 1860
New York Times, “The Herald in Harness,” July 21, 1860
(Montpelier) Vermont Patriot, “A Patriotic Woman,” July 28, 1860
James Buchanan to Gerard Hallock, August 11, 1860
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, "Not Going to Dissolve the Union," August 21, 1860
New York Herald, “Trouble Brewing at Vera Cruz,” August 24, 1860
New York Times, “The Secretary at War Defended,” September 6, 1860
New York Times, “The Nonsense of Disunion,” September 22, 1860
New York Herald, “The Trip to Virginia,” October 7, 1860
New York Herald, “Won't Submit to Lincoln,” October 8, 1860
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Terrors of Submission," October 11, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Wide Awakes at Washington,” October 19, 1860
New York Herald, “American Sensations During 1860,” October 21, 1860
New York Times, “The Disunion Plot at Washington,” October 26, 1860
(Jackson) Mississippian, “A Bugle Blast from Washington,” November 13, 1860
Varina Anne Banks Howell Davis to Jefferson Finis Davis, November 15, 1860
Chicago (IL) Tribune, "An Honest Confession," November 17, 1860
New York Herald, "General Scott Wanted At Washington," November 28, 1860
New York Times, “Political Assassination,” November 29, 1860
John Sherman to William Tecumseh Sherman, December 9, 1860
New York Herald, “The Crisis and Its Solution,” December 10, 1860
New York Times, “The President’s Organ on the Crisis,” December 11, 1860
Abraham Lincoln to John A. Gilmer, December 15, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “What the South Intends to do on the Fourth of March,” December 15, 1860
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Compromise Projects,” December 18, 1860
New York Times,“A Visit to Mr. Lincoln,” December 20, 1860
Bangor (ME) Whig and Courier, “Have We a Traitor at the Head,” December 25, 1860
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "Republican Opposition to a Compromise," December 27, 1860
Charlestown (VA) Free Press, “The Clouds Lowering,” December 27, 1860
New York Herald, “Is South Carolina Out of the Union?,” December 30, 1860
Thomas Cadwallerder to Abraham Lincoln, December 31, 1860
New York Times, “Flight of a Great Criminal,” December 31, 1860
John P. Verree to Abraham Lincoln, January 1, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Danger of the Capital,” January 4, 1861
Joseph Medill to Charles H. Ray and John Locke Scripps, January 6, 1861
Edwin V. Sumner to John G. Nicolay, January 7, 1861
(Montpelier) Vermont Patriot, “Will the Union be Preserved?,” January 12, 1861
New York Times, “Disunion Leading the Way,” January 14, 1861
Alexander K. McClure to Abraham Lincoln, January 15, 1861
New York Herald, “Coercion Symptoms in the West and North-West,” January 15, 1861
Leonard Swett to Abraham Lincoln, January 24, 1861
Elihu B. Washburne to Abraham Lincoln, January 30, 1861
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “A Costly Administration,” February 2, 1861
(Montpelier) Vermont Patriot, “Lincoln and His Guard,” February 2, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Mr. Lincoln’s Views,” February 7, 1861
New York Herald, “More Trouble About Old Abe’s Cabinet,” February 10, 1861
New York Herald, “Free Love and Passional Attraction in the New Administration,” February 13, 1861
Abraham Lincoln's Remarks at Rochester, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1861
Louisville (KY) Journal, “Mr. Lincoln’s Speeches,” February 14, 1861
New York Times, “An Unsatisfactory Defence,” February 15, 1861
Worthington G. Snethen to Abraham Lincoln, February 15, 1861
New York Herald, “Mr. Lincoln on the Tarriff Question,” February 17, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Popular Sovereignty,” February 18, 1861
(Concord) New Hampshire Statesman, “What Will Lincoln Do?,” February 23, 1861
New York Times, “Traitor Officers,” February 26, 1861
New York Herald, “Should Mr. Chase Go Into the Cabinet?,” February 27, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Lincoln’s Flight to Washington,” February 28, 1861
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “Mr. Lincoln at Washington,” March 2, 1861
New York Herald, “Resignations in the Army, Navy and Civil Service of the Federal Government,” March 3, 1861
Winfield Scott to William H. Seward, March 3, 1861
New York Times, “The Plot Against Mr. Lincoln’s Life,” March 4, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "4th of March," March 4, 1861
New York Times, “Reception of the Inaugural,” March 5, 1861
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The President’s Inaugural,” March 5, 1861
Abraham Lincoln to Winfield Scott, March 9, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “A Scurvy Trick,” March 11, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, "Fort Sumter," March 15, 1861
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Impending Downfall of Secession,” March 16, 1861
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Fort Sumter,” March 22, 1861
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Spirit of Washington Letters,” March 25, 1861
New York Times, “Mischievous Rumors,” March 26, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "A Hoax," April 4, 1861
New York Herald, “Old Abe’s Backbone,” April 7, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Prepare to Howl!,” April 10, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "Alarming News," April 11, 1861
New York Herald, “Apprehensions of an Attack on Washington,” April 14, 1861
Winfield Scott to Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1861
Abraham Lincoln, Presidential Proclamation, April 15, 1861, Washington , DC
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Dread Arbitrament of War,” April 15, 1861
Richmond (VA) Dispatch, “Retaliation,” April 15, 1861
Richmond (VA) Dispatch, “Another John Brown Raid,” April 16, 1861
New York Herald, “The Present Administration Doing What The Last Should Have Done,” April 16, 1861
Alexander J. Sessions to Abraham Lincoln, April 16, 1861
James Henderson to Abraham Lincoln, April 16, 1861
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Abolition Anticipations,” April 17, 1861
Savannah (GA) News, “Mails to the South to be Cut Off,” April 20, 1861
Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin's Proclamation, April 20, 1861
New York Times, “The Position of Maryland,” April 20, 1861
Lunsford L. Lomax to George B. Bayard, April 21, 1861, Washington, D.C.
William Seward to Thomas Hicks, April 22, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “We Don’t Believe It!,” April 23, 1861
David D. Field to Abraham Lincoln, April 23, 1861
Andrew H. Reeder to Simon Cameron, April 24, 1861
Proclamation of Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin, April 24, 1861
Abraham Lincoln to Winfield Scott, April 25, 1861
New York Times, “Rushing to Ruin,” April 26, 1861
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Gen. Scott,” April 27, 1861
- C. P. Kirkland, Jr.’s Letter, April 27-28, 1861
Entry by George Templeton Strong, April 27, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Washington Safe,” April 29, 1861
William Willey to Waitman Willey, April 29, 1861
Abraham Lincoln to Robert Anderson, May 1, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "Neutrality," May 2, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "What We Have To Expect," May 6, 1861
New York Times, “Not a War against the South,” May 10, 1861
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Feat of the Zouaves,” May 11, 1861
New York Times, “The Reward of Treason,” May 16, 1861
Montgomery Blair to Abraham Lincoln, May 16, 1861
Boston (MA) Herald, “England and the Southern Blockade,” May 18, 1861
New York Herald, “Letters for the Army,” May 19, 1861
Savannah (GA) News, “Disinterested Black Republican Patriots,” May 22, 1861
Abraham Lincoln to Ephraim and Phoebe Ellsworth, May 25, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Abusing England,” May 27, 1861
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “The Military Policy of the North,” May 29, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Revival of the Sedition Law,” June 13, 1861
Newark (OH) Advocate, “The English People and the American War,” June 14, 1861
Thaddeus S. C. Lowe to Abraham Lincoln, June 16, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “From the West,” June 24, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “More Stealing in Pennsylvania,” July 1, 1861
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Does It Pay to Feed Passing Troops?,” July 3, 1861
Charles B. Calvert to Abraham Lincoln, July 10, 1861
Newark (OH) Advocate, “The Threats and Pressure Under which the President Acts,” July 12, 1861
New York Times, “How to Treat the Vallandighams,” July 13, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “An Absurdity Exposed,” July 24, 1861
Gideon Welles to Abraham Lincoln, August 5, 1861
Andrew Johnson and William B. Carter to Abraham Lincoln, August 6, 1861
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “The Critical Time of the Union Cause,” August 9, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Simon Cameron,” August 11, 1861
Savannah (GA) News, “Abe Lincoln Assassinated!,” August 13, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Impatience,” August 26, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “How They Do It,” September 21, 1861
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “Naval Expeditions and the Press,” October 10, 1861
Winfield Scott to Simon Cameron, Request for Retirement, Washington, D.C., October 31, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “The Final Blow to Liberty,” October 31, 1861
United States Army Order Number 19 , Washington, D.C., November 1, 1861
John S. Phelps to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, November 18, 1861
Major-General George McClellan, General Orders No. 48 on Chaplains and the Army, November 27, 1861
William H. Seward to George B. McClellan, Contrabands in District of Columbia, December 4, 1861
Alexander Galt to Amy Galt, Washington DC, December 5, 1861
Abraham Lincoln to Arnold Fischel, December 14, 1861
Secretary William H. Seward to General Andrew Porter, Arrest Order for George Wallace Jones, December 19, 1861
Secretary of War Simon Cameron to Brigadier-General George A. McCall, December 28, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Resignation of Secretary Cameron,” January 14, 1862
Edwin M. Stanton, Order to the Army with President Lincoln's congratulations on recent victory in Kentucky, January 22, 1862
Secretary of State William H. Seward to Ward Lamon, Order Protecting Fugitive Slaves from Arrest, January 25, 1862
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Spies and Traitors,” February 15, 1862
Horace Greeley to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, March 24, 1862, New York City
Abraham Lincoln to Henry Wilson, May 15, 1862
New York National Anti-Slavery Standard, "New Publications," July 19, 1862
New York National Anti-Slavery Standard, "Speech of Rev. M.D. Conway," August 9, 1862
Shreveport (LA) News, “On the Wane,” August 15, 1862
Reverdy Johnson to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, September 05, 1862
Abraham Lincoln to George Brinton McClellan, October 25, 1862
Abraham Lincoln to Whom It May Concern, November 1, 1862
Boston (MA) Liberator, "The Two Capitals," November 28, 1862
Entry by Orville Browning, December 18, 1862
Green Adams to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, December 31, 1862, Washington D.C.
Thurlow Weed to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, March 4, 1865, Washington D.C.
John T. Cuddy to John H. Cuddy, March 11, 1863
New York Herald, “What is the Rebel Army of Virginia About?,” May 31, 1863
Abraham Lincoln to Erastus Corning and others, June 12, 1863
Abraham Lincoln to Ulysses Simpson Grant, July 13, 1863
Orders from Henry Wager Halleck to William Handy Ludlow, July 15, 1863
Carlisle (PA) American, “Fitzhugh Lee,” July 22, 1863
John Hay to John Nicolay, August 7, 1863
Abraham Lincoln to James C. Conkling, August 26, 1863
Edward Everett to Abraham Lincoln, November 20, 1863, Washington, D.C.
Ruben F. Briggs to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, March 15, 1864, New Orleans, Louisiana
Abraham Lincoln to Albert G. Hodges, April 4, 1864
Benjamin Brown French to Abraham Lincoln, May 5, 1864, Washington, D.C.
Abraham Lincoln to Salmon P. Chase, June 30, 1864
Bangor (ME) Whig and Courier, “The Destruction of Chambersburg,” August 2, 1864
Entry by Edward Bates, August 4, 1864
Henry J. Raymond to Abraham Lincoln, August 22, 1864, New York City
Edward Bates to Abraham Lincoln, November 24, 1864
Andrew Johnson to Montgomery Blair, November 24, 1863, Nashville, Tennessee.
Theodore M. Pomeroy to Elizabeth L.W. Pomeroy, February 1, 1865
Ulysses S. Grant to Abraham Lincoln, January 21, 1865
Edwin Stanton, Orders for ceremonies at Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina
Abraham Lincoln, Last Speech in Public, April 11, 1865
Major General Quincy A. Gillmore to Brigadier General E.D. Townsend, War Department, Washington, D.C., April 13, 1865
Edwin M. Stanton to Major General William T. Sherman, April 15, 1865
Henry W. Halleck to William T. Sherman, April 15, 1865
Report of Messrs. Brough and Garrett on arrangements for the transport of President Lincoln's remains to Illinois, April 18, 1865
William T. Sherman to William W. Halleck, April 18, 1865
Ulysses S. Grant to Winfield Scott Hancock, Washington D.C., April 19, 1865
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, “The Calamity,” April 19, 1865
Repudiation of the "Basis of Agreement for the surrender of the Confederate Army of the Tennessee"
William T. Clark to Ida Clark, Washington D.C., April 19, 1865
President Andrew Johnson, Reply to a Delegation of Southern Refugees, Washington D.C., April 24, 1865
James Buchanan to Horatio King, May 1, 1865
Andrew Johnson, "Remarks to the First Colored Regiment of the District of Columbia," October 10, 1865, Washington D.C.
William Henry Seward, Announcement of the Ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, December 18, 1865, Washington, DC
Frederick Douglass, et al, to Andrew Johnson, February 7, 1866
Editorial, New York World, February 20, 1866
Andrew Johnson, Speech before Washington's Birthday Meeting, Washington, D.C., February 22, 1866
Ulysses S. Grant to Andrew Johnson, March 16, 1866
"The President's Veto," Daily Union and American (Nashville, TN), March 28, 1866
George William Curtis, "The Civil Rights Bill," Harper's Weekly Magazine, April 14, 1866, pp. 226-227.
Brigadier General Edward D. Townsend to Major General Oliver O. Howard, Washington, D.C., April 17, 1866
War Department, General Order 26, Washington, DC, May 1, 1866
William Seward to Judson Kilpatrick, Washington, DC, June 2, 1866
Oliver O. Howard to Edwin Stanton, Washington, DC, September 17, 1866.
Carlisle (PA) American Volunteer, “Lecture by Frederick Douglass,” March 7, 1872
- John G. Nicolay's conversation with James Moorhead, May 12-13, 1880
How to Cite This Page: "Washington, DC," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/9046.