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Lincoln-Douglas Debates (King, 1986)

Textbook

David C. King et al., United States History: Presidential Edition (Menlo Park, California: Addison – Wesley Publishing Company, 1986), 271.

Douglas claimed that, although it was legal for an owner to bring a slave into any territory, citizens could refuse to enact laws protecting slavery. Without slave codes, slavery simply could not exist. Many voters were impressed with Douglas's logic. Douglas's reply became known as the Freeport Doctrine. He claimed that, although it was legal for an owner to bring a slave into any territory, citizens could refuse to enact laws protecting slavery. Without slave codes, slavery simply could not exist. Many voters were impressed with Douglas's logic. In the Free Doctrine, however, Douglas angered northern abolitionists by dismissing the moral issue of slavery. Furthermore, Dogulas lost southern support by suggesting a way to get around the Dred Scott decision and thus stop the extension of slavery. Douglas was reelected to the Senate. In the upcoming presidential election, however, southerners would not forget his stand.
How to Cite This Page: "Lincoln-Douglas Debates (King, 1986)," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/17023.