William Tatum Wofford (Dictionary of American Biography)

Reference
Dumas Malone, ed., Dictionary of American Biography (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1961), 10: 440-41.
After Georgia had withdrawn from the union, however, Wofford loyally offered his services to his state, and was commissioned colonel of the 18th Georgia Regiment. After brief service in North Carolina, he was attached to Hood’s brigade and took part in the campaigns around Richmond in 1862. After Hood’s promotion Wofford commanded the brigade at Second Manassas (Bull Run), and South Mountain, and Sharpsburg, and was commended by Hood for “gallant conduct” and “conspicuous bravery.” He served under Brig-Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb and, after Cobb’s death at Fredericksburg, was promoted, Jan. 19, 1863, to the rank of brigadier-general. He led the brigade at Chancellorsville and rendered valuable service under Longstreet at Gettysburg. Against the wishes of Lee, who considered him one of the best brigadier-generals in the division, Wofford was sent with Longstreet to East Tennessee, where he led the unsuccessful assault on Knoxville. He was then attached to Kershaw’s division, and saw service in the desperate campaigns of 1864 around Richmond and Petersburg, and in the Shenandoah Valley. Twice…he was wounded…. He surrendered to Gen. H. M. Judah at Resaca, Ga., on May 2, 1865.

The war being over, Wofford devoted his energy and means to the care of the starving and the economic, industrial and educational rehabilitation of his devastated section of the state. Elected to Congress in 1865, he was refused his seat by the Radical Republicans, but through the aid of Judge Kelly of Pennsylvania obtained much-needed food and supplies for his district.
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