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William Elisha Stoker to Elizabeth E. Stoker, February 4, 1863

William Elisha Stoker to Elizabeth E. Stoker, February 4, 1863 (Page 1)
In the depths of winter in early 1863, Confederate private William E. Stoker, after much thought, decided not to desert, by which he would drag his and his family’s name through the mud by not “fighting for his country.” Stoker, who wrote shortly after the release of the Emancipation Proclamation, described that Federal Troops were deserting because they did not want “to fight to free the negrowes.” Yet, unlike the Feds who were leaving the army, Stoker would not come home until he did “like a white man,” a possible reference to runaway slaves on the Underground Railroad. (By David Gillespie)

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How to Cite This Page: "William Elisha Stoker to Elizabeth E. Stoker, February 4, 1863," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/26199.