William Elisha Stoker to Elizabeth E. Stoker, October 3, 1862

Source citation
William Elisha Stoker to Elizabeth E. Stoker, October 3, 1862, William E. Stoker Papers, National Civil War Museum, Harrisburg, PA.
Recipient (to)
Stoker, Elizabeth E.
Type
Letter
Date Certainty
Exact
Transcriber
David Gillespie, Dickinson College
Transcription date
The following text is presented here in complete form, as it originally appeared in print. Spelling and typographical errors have been preserved as in the original.

Oct the 3rd 1862

Arkansas Near Duvauls Bluff [De Valls Bluff]

Dear Wife Ive sat down sat down this morning to write you a few lines to let you know how I am. I am well at this time and I hope thees few lines may find you and familey well. Ive nothing new to write. Onley we are expecting a fight pretty soon. We have ben on a force march too days without any thing to eat but a little flower bread maid up with cold water. We travailed all day yestedey threw the rain and mud and water from half leg to nee deep. We are laying by to day. There was so many of the waggons broke down yestedey that we will have to wait untill they can get up. This march taken the privats on suprise when we lay down one night at the place where we was campped this side of Little Rock. We had no idea of moveing in too weekes but about three oclock the drums waked us and the order come to be reddy to travail in a hour and a half and we had to start wether we was reddy or not. All of our sick was left. There was 4 out of my mess. Coatney Walt Robertson Ant Johnson and Ben Jones but they was all getting well. Betty you need not to be suprised to heare of a fight up hear in this part of the cuntry. Soo I think from the appearance of every thing it wont be long before we will be standing faceing the feds. There is a big armey of them up hear above us about too days travail for us and we are going right too them. Betty sircumstances is goin to be so I dont know wether I can write to you regular or not. I will if I have the chance sometimes. I almost give up all hops of getting homeany more. A soldier has hard times. They stand tin chances to get killed or dye to one to get home. I want you to save this. I dont know wether I will be spard to write you any nother letter or not. I have wrote to you regular and I had heep rather see you than to write. Write me word how you are getting along. I feel uneasey about you. I am afraid for you to stay there bye your self. I wis you could get your big siss to live with you. It made me feel powerful sorry for you to hear that was so lonesome though I new when I come of that you would be lonesome. I reckon Priscilla is getting along bigenough to be a heep of companey to you. When you write to me tell me all the nuse generally. Let me know what you have done for salt and how your hogs is doing. Betty have some thing done with that cotton. I wish the old man would have it halled over to his gin house and put in a good rail pen. It will help it to moove it. If this abominable war ever breakes up it will be worth something. But it looks like there will be no peace. Soo I was in hopes some time a go that we would hav peace but there is no prospect for peace. Now I dont care how soon it is maid. I want to come home. I want to see you and Priscilla. I cant tell you how bad I want to see. I dont know where we will be stationed. Direct yours to Little rock. I reckon Ile get it. I beleave I have wrote all I can think of. Ile close. Give my best respects to all enquireing friend and receiv more than dubble portion for your self.

My pen is bad my ink is pail
My love to you will never fail.
Tell Het and Alf Howdy

William E. Stoker
To Elizabeth E. Stoker
William Elisha Stoker

Footnotes

Minor Figures

Alf – Slave on the Stoker farm

Het – Slave on the Stoker farm

Priscilla Stoker – William and Elizabeth’s young daughter

How to Cite This Page: "William Elisha Stoker to Elizabeth E. Stoker, October 3, 1862," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/27324.