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After Philippi, nineteen years old James Edward Hanger becomes the first amputee of the Civil War

The Battle of Philippi in western Virginia, June 3, 1861, artist's impression, detail
06/03/1861
After the battle at Philippi, James Edward Hanger, a 19 year-old Washington College sophomore and recruit in the Virginia infantry, became the war's first amputee when a Union surgeon removed his shattered right leg just below the hip. Returning home on a prisoner exchange, he developed an artificial limb - "the Hanger Leg."  He patented it in 1863 and developed the company that still operates as Hanger Prosthetics & Orthotics.  (By John Osborne)  
Source Citation: 
Jennifer David McDaid, "'How a One-Legged Rebel LIves' - Confederate Veterans and Artificial Limbs in Virginia," in Katherine Ott, David Serlin, and Steven Mihm, eds., Artificial Parts, Practical Lives: Modern Histories of Prosthetics (New York: New York University Press, 2002), 119. 

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How to Cite This Page: "After Philippi, nineteen years old James Edward Hanger becomes the first amputee of the Civil War," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/38295.