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In Louisiana, the garrison of Fort Jackson mutinies and the fort surrenders soon after

Civil War at Sea Topic Image, Crew members of the USS Pawnee
04/27/1862 to 04/28/1862
The Confederate defenders of Fort Jackson, the main strongpoint on the Mississippi River defending New Orleans, had endured flood conditions and an almost constant naval bombardment for nearly ten days.  When news that New Orleans itself had been captured reached them, much of the garrison mutinied overnight, spiked the fort's guns, and prepared to desert en masse. Powerless to stop them, their officers allowed them to leave but, when the sun rose, decided the fort was no longer defensible and surrendered. (By John Osborne)
Source Citation: 
Official Reports of Battles, as published by order of the Confederate Congress (Richmond, VA: Enquirer Book and Job Press, 1862), 382-384.

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