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Rebels in Spanish-ruled Santo Domingo make a new declaration of independence

Caribbean and West Indies, 1857, zoomable map
09/14/1863
The Dominican Republic had been independent of Spain for seventeen years when its dictator, Pedro Santana, engineered Spanish recolonization in 1861. Exiles gathered in neighboring Haiti and launched a "War of Restoration." The day after the capture of the provincial city of Santiago, a provisional government declared independence once again. A two-year war ensued and Spain finally revoked its recolonization in May 1865. (By John Osborne)  
Source Citation: 
G. Pope Atkins, The Dominican Republic and the United States: From Imperialism to Transnationalism (Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 1996), 18.
 
 

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How to Cite This Page: "Rebels in Spanish-ruled Santo Domingo make a new declaration of independence," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/41708.