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Editorial, "The Fall of Richmond and Southern Feeling," New York Times, April 6, 1865

Confederate Capitol, Richmond, Virginia, 1865, zoomable image
In a lengthy editorial, the editorial board of the New York Times speculated what would happen next after the fall of the Confederate capital city of Richmond. Considering why the Confederacy would continue to resist before inevitable defeat, the piece first discusses the loyalty of Confederate troops towards their commander, General Robert E. Lee. Commenting that southerners had no such feeling about their civil leaders, the article went on to decry the absence of responsible leaders that could seize the moment and negotiate for surrender, thus setting up the South for a quicker rehabilitation into the Union. It mentions Confederate Vice-President Alexander Stephens as one such candidate but, in the end, dismisses him because "he shrinks from responsibility." (By John Osborne)

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How to Cite This Page: "Editorial, "The Fall of Richmond and Southern Feeling," New York Times, April 6, 1865," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/43824.