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In Washington, the U.S. Senate votes to over-ride the presidential veto of the Civil Rights Bill

Legislative Iconic image, U.S. Capitol, 2008
04/06/1866
Congress had completed passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1866 on March 13, 1866 but President Johnson had vetoed the measure as unconstitutional and an intrusion on states' rights. Congress had failed to over-ride a previous veto of the Freedmen's Bureau bill but this time a more determined and united Senate voted 33-15 to succeed. The House voted three days later with similar success and the Civil Rights Bill became law, the first time in history a presidential veto had been over-turned.  (By John Osborne) 
Source Citation: 
William A. Barnes, History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1868), 288.
How to Cite This Page: "In Washington, the U.S. Senate votes to over-ride the presidential veto of the Civil Rights Bill," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/45074.