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George William Curtis, "The Civil Rights Bill," Harper's Weekly Magazine, March 31, 1866, p. 194.

George William Curtis, engraving, detail
In an editorial written just before President Johnson vetoed the measure, the political editor of Harpers' Weekly Magazine and loyal founder-member of the Republican Party George William Curtis wrote to praise the recently passed Civil Rights Bill. Stating the the bill did away with the Black Codes designed in the South "to retain as many of the disabilities of slavery as possible," Curtis goes on to say, rather hopefully, that the immense congressional majorities in the bill's favor suggested that the President should sign the legislation. By the time this editorial appeared in the March 31, 1866 issue of Harper's Weekly, Johnson had rejected the measure with a lengthy veto message and Curtis authored another editorial two weeks later, urging the over-riding of the veto. Republicans in Congress did, indeed, employ their large majorities in both houses, and for the first time in American history, overturned a presidential veto. The Civil Rights Act became law on April 9, 1866. (By John Osborne)

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How to Cite This Page: "George William Curtis, "The Civil Rights Bill," Harper's Weekly Magazine, March 31, 1866, p. 194. ," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/45076.