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The eastern end of the new Atlantic Cable is delivered to Valencia in Ireland.

Landing of the eastern end of the new Atlantic Telegraph Cable, Valentia Island, Ireland, July 1866, artist's impression
07/07/1866

In Foilhummerum Bay, the cable ship William Cory began the unloading of the eastern end of the new Atlantic Cable for its connection to the station at Valentia, County Kerry in Ireland.  Six days later the thirty-mile long shore-end cable was payed out and connected with the Great Eastern, which would lay the main cable across the Atlantic, arriving in Newfoundland after a two-week operation. On July 27, 1866, confirming messages were exchanged between Ireland and Canada.  (By John Osborne)

Source Citation: 

Chester G. Hearn, Circuits in the Sea: The Men, the Ships, and the Atlantic Cable (Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2004), 226-230.

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