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In Mobile, Alabama, deadly rioting disrupts a Republican public meeting and two die.

Pro-Confederate mob confronting Pennsylvania's William D. Kelley in Mobile, Alabama, May 14, 1867, artist's impression.
05/14/1867

In Mobile, Alabama, home to large numbers of former Confederate soldiers and black Union veterans, racial tensions were elevated, particularly on the current issue of whether African-Americans could be allowed to ride in city streetcars. A Republican Party public meeting with famous radical Pennsylvania congressman, William D. Kelley, as main speaker, was disrupted on this day with shots fired on the edge of the crowd resulting in two deaths and several other woundings. Strongly reported in the Northern press, this riot did little to reduce radical Union ideas  that the Civil War had not yet ended. (By John Osborne)

Source Citation: 

United States Senate and the U.S. War Department, "Federal Aid in Domestic Disturbances, 1903-1922," Congressional Serial Set, 67th Congress (Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1922), 95.

How to Cite This Page: "In Mobile, Alabama, deadly rioting disrupts a Republican public meeting and two die.," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/46595.