Back to top

In northern England, three Fenians convicted of murder are hanged in Manchester.

Britain and British Affairs, iconic image
11/23/1867

In Manchester in northern England, the three Irish nationalists convicted of the murder of a local police sergeant killed in the daring rescue of Fenian leaders in late September 1867 were executed in public on the walls of the New Bailey Prison.  Sergeant Charles Brett had been the first Manchester policeman ever killed in the line of duty.  The three men, William Philip Allen, Michael Larkin, and Michael O'Brien, went to the gallows together early in the morning after appeals that their crime was political were dismissed and went down in Irish nationalist folklore at the "Manchester Martyrs." (By John Osborne)

Source Citation: 

"Chronicle of Remarkable Occurences in 1867", The Annual Register or a View of the History and Politics of the Year 1867 (London: F. & J. Rivington, 1868), 156-161.

Tabs

How to Cite This Page: "In northern England, three Fenians convicted of murder are hanged in Manchester.," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/46642.