Back to top

Cambridge, MA

Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1859

Cambridge, Ms., City and one of the seats of justice of Middlesex co. This is the seat of Cambridge University, the oldest and best endowed of the colleges in the United States. It may be divided into three parts — Old Cambridge, where the college is situated, about 3 miles W. from Boston; Cambridgeport, a flourishing village, about midway between Boston and Old Cambridge ; and East Cambridge, where the county buildings are located, immediately connected with Boston by Cragie's Bridge over Charles River; also with the city of Charles- town by a bridge. (Gazetteer of the United States of America, 1854)

CAMBRIDGE, city, seat of justice, together with Concord and Lowell of Middlesex co„ Mass, 3 ms. N. W. of Boston; from W. 537 m. Watered by Charles river. In the old part of the city, stands Harvard university, the most ancient and wealthy collegiate institution in America. This includes a theological, medical, and law school, and has a library of about 100,000 volumes, the largest in the Union. Merchants and others doing business in Boston, reside in this city, and some of the dwellings are costly and splendid. At Cambridge, were the entrenchments of the American army when beseiging Boston under Washington. Glass and other manufactures are extensively produced. From its proximity to Boston, the railroads and other lines of travel are common to both places. One mile west of the college is Mount Auburn cemetery, consecrated by nature and by art to the holy purpose to which it is devoted. The population in 1810, was 2,323; in 1820, ------; in 1830, 6,071; in 1840, 8,409; in 1850, 17,417.  (Fanning's, 1853)

Tabs

How to Cite This Page: "Cambridge, MA," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/9393.