Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Difference between a Free Negro and a Fugitive Slave," October 7, 1851

Source citation
"The Difference between a Free Negro and a Fugitive Slave," Charleston (SC) Mercury, October 7, 1851, p. 2: 4.
Original source
Chicago (IL) Commercial Advertiser
Newspaper: Publication
Charleston Mercury
Newspaper: Headline
The Difference between a Free Negro and a Fugitive Slave
Newspaper: Page(s)
2
Newspaper: Column
4
Type
Newspaper
Date Certainty
Exact
Transcriber
Sayo Ayodele
Transcription date
Transcriber's Comments
The following text is presented here in complete form, as it originally appeared in print. Spelling and typographical errors have been preserved as in the original.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A FREE NEGRO AND A FUGITIVE SLAVE. - A darkey in the South part of this State, stole a fine horse, and soon after a saddle and bridle. Riding him into Alton, he sold him with his equipment to a sort of smart trading mulatto, for one hundred dollars down, and then "broke for an Abolition settlement," passing himself off for a fugitive, was furnished with food, money, and means, by the "higher law" folks of the whole route. The unfortunate free mulatto, after the horse, saddle and bridle, had been taken by the real owners of them, started in pursuit. He has had to pay his own way along, and meets with no assistance to overtake and catch the free negro horse thief who swindled him. When a free darkey wants to travel he should take the underground railroad, and pass himself for a fugitive slave.

[Chicago Com. Ado.

How to Cite This Page: "Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Difference between a Free Negro and a Fugitive Slave," October 7, 1851 ," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/1359.