Bryant, William Cullen

Life Span
to
Full name
William Cullen Bryant
Place of Birth
Burial Place
Birth Date Certainty
Exact
Death Date Certainty
Exact
Gender
Male
Race
White
Sectional choice
North
Origins
Free State
No. of Spouses
1
No. of Children
2
Family
Peter Bryant (father), Sarah Snell (mother), Frances Fairchild (wife)
Education
Other
Other Education
Williams College, MA
Occupation
Attorney or Judge
Journalist
Writer or Artist
Other
Other Occupation
Poet
Relation to Slavery
White non-slaveholder
Political Parties
Republican

William Cullen Bryant (American National Biography)

Scholarship
While forcefully addressing the issues of the day, Bryant and the Post spoke in a moderate voice, seeking to convince through solid reasoning and eloquence. In the years before the Civil War, Bryant supported the new Republican party and its Free Soil platform. Indeed, it was Bryant who introduced Abraham Lincoln when he gave his famous speech at Cooper Union in 1860. When Lincoln became president, the Evening Post, while being generally supportive of the administration, urged more decisiveness and vigor in the waging of the war. Bryant not only corresponded with Lincoln, but, in 1862, also joined a delegation pressing for greater military action. Upon the assassination of Lincoln, Bryant read to the bereaved New Yorkers gathered in Union Square his poem "The Death of Lincoln" (1865), which began, "Oh, slow to smite and swift to spare, / Gentle and merciful and just!"
Albert F. McLean, "Bryant, William Cullen," American National Biography Online, February 2000, http://www.anb.org/articles/16/16-00213.html.
Chicago Style Entry Link
Brown, Charles H. William Cullen Bryant: A Biography. New York: Scribner, 1971.
view record
Symington, Andrew James. William Cullen Bryant: A Biographical Sketch. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1880. view record
How to Cite This Page: "Bryant, William Cullen," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/34087.