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In New York City, William H. Seward says in a speech that disunion will be avoided

William Henry Seward, circa 1860, detail
12/22/1860
In a speech at the Astor House in New York City to the New England Society, two days after South Carolina's secession, Senator William H. Seward laid out the strengths of the Union, saying that even now if a foreign power attacked New York, South Carolina would come to held defend it.  He concluded with the belief that tensions were being mollified so that "sixty days more suns will give you a much brighter and more cheerful atmosphere."  (By John Osborne) 
Source Citation: 
 "Documents and Narratives," in Frank Moore, The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives, Illustrative Incidents, Poetry, Etc. (New York: G.P.Putnam, 1861), I: 6-7.

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How to Cite This Page: "In New York City, William H. Seward says in a speech that disunion will be avoided," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/34800.