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In Philadelphia, white streetcar riders vote overwhelmingly to keep black citizens from city streetcars

Pennsylvania Rail Road Station, Eleventh and Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1861
01/31/1865
Black leaders in Philadelphia had earlier urged the city's transport companies to emulate New York City and desegregate their services. A public company survey of all customers on the question "Shall colored persons be allowed to ride in all the cars" resulted in an overwhelming "no" vote. Despite this, a few streetcar lines made some efforts to integrate but it was not until 1867 that state action forced full integration of city transport.  (By John Osborne)
Source Citation: 
Russell F. Weigley, "The Border City in Civil War, 1854-1865" in Russell Frank Weigley, Nicholas B. Wainwright, Edwin Wolf, et al, Philadelphia: A 300 Year History (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., Inc, 1982), 415-416.
J.Thomas Scharf and Thompson Wescott, History of Philadelphia 1609-1884, in three volumes (Philadelphia, PA: L.H. Everts & Co., 1884), I: 821

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