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The Wisconsin Supreme Court rules that male Wisconsin African-Americans have the right to vote

Wisconsin, 1857, zoomable map
03/28/1866
In a landmark case, the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled that African-Americans had the right to vote in the state.  A Milwaukee man, Ezekiel Gillespie, had sued in county court for the right to vote under the ruling of a 1849 state referendum which had authorized black manhood suffrage but had been set aside on the pretext that too few citizens had voted.  Gillespie's suit was rejected and he appealed to the Supreme Court who over-turned the judgement and stated that Wisconsin African-American men had the right to vote.  (By John Osborne) 
Source Citation: 
"Wisconsin: The Supreme Court on Negro Suffrage," New York Times, March 29, 1866, p. 5.
Hugh Davis, "We Will Be Satisfied With Nothing Less": The African American Struggle for Equal Rights in the North During Reconstruction (Ithaca, NY: Cornell Univeristy Press, 2011), 50.

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