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Address of the Colored Convention of Indiana to the Citizens of Indiana, Indianapolis, Indiana,

Indiana State Capitol, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1861, artist's impression

One of the numerous "Colored Conventions" being held around the United States in 1866 took place in Indianapolis Indiana and opened on November 6.  At its conclusion four days later, an address aimed at the "loyal voters of Indiana" called for the vote for African-Americans in the state.  The address noted that most black residents were loyal and tax-paying contributors to the welfare of the state and that many had fought for the Union in the African-American regiments. It included an interesting argument concerning equality, holding that equality of franchise did not mean social equality, and saying that Indiana politicians did not consider more than half their present constituents as their social equals. Social equality is a matter of culture and, the address concluded, cannot be legislated and men that voted together need not associate together, unless they desired to do so. (By John Osborne) 

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How to Cite This Page: "Address of the Colored Convention of Indiana to the Citizens of Indiana, Indianapolis, Indiana, ," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/45972.