Samuel Eli Cornish, pioneer black journalist and abolitionist, dies in Brooklyn

Samuel Eli Cornish, who had co-founded the nation's first black newspaper in 1827, called Freedom's Journal, and served as the vice president of African Missionary Society for the previous decade, died at his home in Brooklyn, New York, aged sixty-three. Born a free black in Delaware, he had been ordained in the Presbyterian Church in 1822 in New York City. He was a founder member of the American Anti-Slavery Society and had been an influential voice in the New York City area for decades. (By John Osborne)
Source Citation
Graham Russell Hodges, "Samuel Eli Cornish," American National Biography Online, February 2000, http://www.anb.org/articles/15/15-00147.html.
Date Certainty
Exact
Type
Personal
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General
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