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Proclamation of the Allied Commissioners to the People of Mexico, Vera Cruz, January 10, 1862

Mexico, 1857, zoomable map
Mexico had suspended interest payments on the nation's giant foreign debt in July 1861. On October 31, 1861, the main European debtors, Britain, France, and Spain, signed a convention in London for an occupation of Mexican customs houses, beginning with Vera Cruz, to force continued payments. In January 1862, Spanish, British and French naval units arrived and landed troops at the port. The commissioners of the three powers issued the following proclamation to the Mexican people, decrying those who had brought the country to such a situation and insisting that the aims of the powers did not include lengthy occupation or domination but did offer friendship and support for Mexico's independence. (By John Osborne)

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How to Cite This Page: "Proclamation of the Allied Commissioners to the People of Mexico, Vera Cruz, January 10, 1862," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/38607.