Curtis, George William

George William Curtis was a leading author and journalist who edited the influential magazine Harper's Weekly for a number of years beginning during the Civil War. Born into a wealthy New England family, Curtis traveled widely as a youth and enjoyed unique experiences in nineteenth-century communes and with leading Transcendentalists such as Ralph Waldo Emerson or Henry David Thoreau. Before the war, he also wrote extensively for the popular New York Tribune. He later became a columnist for several magazines, eventually settling into a leading position at Harper's. Curtis was generally a loyal Republican until his disgust over the corruption of the Reconstruction era drove him into a more independent position. He died in 1892. (By Matthew Pinsker)
Life Span
to
Full name
George William Curtis
Place of Birth
Birth Date Certainty
Exact
Death Date Certainty
Exact
Gender
Male
Race
White
Sectional choice
North
Origins
Free State
Family
James Burrill Curtis (brother)
Occupation
Journalist
Writer or Artist
Relation to Slavery
White non-slaveholder
Political Parties
Republican
Government
Grant Administration (1869-77)
Local government
How to Cite This Page: "Curtis, George William," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, https://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/index.php/node/33827.