Abraham Lincoln to Henry Clay Whitney, June 7, 1855

Source citation
Abraham Lincoln to Henry Clay Whitney, June 7, 1855, Springfield, IL, in Roy P. Basler, ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln (8 vols., New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1953), 2: 313, http://quod.lib.umich.edu/l/lincoln/.
Type
Letter
Date Certainty
Exact
Transcriber
Transcription adapted from The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln (1953), edited by Roy P. Basler
Adapted by Matthew Pinsker, Dickinson College
Transcriber's Comments
Stephen T. Logan was Lincoln's former law partner.  Henry Clay Whitney was a young attorney. The "Prohibitory Law" was an attempt to introduce the "Maine Law" or temperance to Illinois.
The following transcript has been adapted from The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln (1953).

H. C. Whitney, Esq Springfield,
My dear Sir: June 7. 1855

Your note containing election news is received; and for which I thank you. It is all of no use, however. Logan is worse beaten than any other man ever was since elections were invented---beaten more than 1200 in this county.

It is conceded on all hands that the Prohibitory law is also beaten.  Yours truly A. LINCOLN---

How to Cite This Page: "Abraham Lincoln to Henry Clay Whitney, June 7, 1855," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, https://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/1306.