New York Times, “Important from Kansas,” February 27, 1857

Source citation
“Important from Kansas,” New York Times, February 27, 1857, p. 1: 5.
Newspaper: Publication
New York Daily Times
Newspaper: Headline
Important from Kansas
Newspaper: Page(s)
1
Newspaper: Column
5
Type
Newspaper
Date Certainty
Exact
Transcriber
Meghan Allen, Dickinson College
Transcription date
The following text is presented here in complete form, as it originally appeared in print.  Spelling and other typographical errors have been preserved as in the original.

Important from Kansas.

GROSS OUTRAGE UPON GOV. GEARY — DIFICULTY WITH JUDGE SHERROD — MR. SHEPHERD AND JUDGE SHERROD SHOT

ST. LOUIS, Wednesday, Feb. 25.

The Jefferson City correspondent of the St. Louis Democrat learns from the passengers from Kansas to-night that a serious difficulty had arisen between GOV. GEARY and Judge SHERROD, growing out of the refusal of the former to appoint the latter Sheriff as desired by the Legislature. SHERROD had avowed his intention to kill the Governor, and meeting him shortly afterward in the street, spit in his face. GEARY did not resent this, but his friends got up an indignation meeting on Thursday, the 19th, which Sheriff JONES, Judge SHERROD, and others, attempted to break up, when a conflict ensured, in which SHERROD shot Mr. SHEPPERD, one of GOV. GEARY’S fiends, four times, killing him, and wounding two others. Mr. JONES, the Governor’s Secretary, then shot SHERROD, the ball passing through his head, and killing him instantly. Very great excitement existed at Lecompton, and a general fight was anticipated that night. GOV. GEARY’S residence was guarded by United States troops.

ST. LOUSIS, Thursday, Feb. 26.

S.W. SHERROD or SHERRARD is the man who was appointed by the Court to fill the vacancy occasioned by Sheriff JONES’ resignation, and to whom GOVERNOR GEARY refused to grant a commission, on the ground of his habitual drunkenness. The Westport correspondent of the Republican says that SHERROD did not spit in the Governor’s face, but called him a liar, coward and scoundrel. The remainder of the report is not yet corroborated, nor is it contradicted. We look for letters from Lecompton to-night.

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