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Claiborne Fox Jackson to the Soldiers and Fellow-Citizens of Missouri, December 13, 1861

Claiborne Fox Jackson, engraving, detail
Though Union troops occupying much of the state, Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson remained defiant. A rump session of the legislature had passed an ordinance of secession at Neosho, Missouri had voted for secession in late October 1861. A month later the Confederate Congress had admitted Missouri as its eleventh state. Since July, however, the Union-backing majority legislature were sitting in Union-occupied Jefferson City, with Hamilton Gamble as provisional governor. With this lengthy and colorful declaration, Jackson called for the troops of the Missouri State Guard, fighting the Union occupation since May 1861, to extend their six month enlistment, outlined their successes and their future under the Confederacy, and called, in patriotic but often in threatening tones, on all Missourians to fight for the independence of the state against the invading federal government. Jackson and most Confederate supporters were forced from the state, however, and Jackson himself died of stomach cancer in exile at Little Rock, Arkansas, exactly one week short of a year after this declaration. (By John Osborne)

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How to Cite This Page: "Claiborne Fox Jackson to the Soldiers and Fellow-Citizens of Missouri, December 13, 1861," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/38510.