Conway, Moncure Daniel

Moncure Conway was a unique figure in the House Divided era—a southern abolitionist. Born in Virginia, educated at Dickinson, Conway began a career as a Methodist minister before experiencing a crisis of conscience that led him to New England, the Unitarian Church and a prominent role as an anti-slavery activist.

Life Span
to
Dickinson Connection
Class of 1849, Trustee
Full name
Moncure Daniel Conway
Place of Birth
Burial Place
Birth Date Certainty
Exact
Gender
Male
Race
White
Origins
Slave State
No. of Siblings
4
No. of Spouses
1
No. of Children
4
Family
Walker Peyton Conway (father), Margaret Daniel Conway (mother), Ellen Dana Conway (wife), Walker Peyton Conway, Jr. (brother), Richard Conway (brother), Peter Conway (brother), Mildred Conway (sister), Dana Conway (son), Emerson Conway (son), Eustace Conway (son), Mildred Conway (daughter), Eustace Conway (uncle), George Washington Conway (uncle), Henry R. Conway (uncle), Jane Conway (aunt), Margaret Conway (aunt), Valentine Conway (uncle), Elizabeth Daniel (cousin), John Moncure Daniel (cousin), Travers Daniel (uncle), Fanny Tomlin Moncure (cousin), Richard Moncure (uncle)
Education
Dickinson (Carlisle College)
Harvard
Occupation
Clergy
Journalist
Writer or Artist
Relation to Slavery
White non-slaveholder
Other Relation to Slavery
Liberated his father's slaves
Other Religion
Freethought
Political Parties
Republican
Slaveholding in 1860
0
Household Size in 1860
3
Children in 1860
1
Occupation in 1860
Minister
Political Party in 1860
Republican
Residence in 1860
Religion in 1860
Unitarian

Moncure Daniel Conway was born the second son of an old and distinguished Virginia family on March 17, 1832 in Stafford County, Virginia. He was related to the Washingtons, the Madisons, and the Lees. His uncle on his mother’s side sat as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Both his father, Walker Peyton Conway, a prominent slaveholding landowner and his mother, Margaret Daniel Conway, had converted after their marriage to Methodism and the Conway children were exposed at an early age to disciplined evangelicalism. Moncure Conway first was schooled at home then attended the thriving Fredericksburg Classical and Mathematical Academy, a school that had educated Washington and other famous Virginians. He then followed his brother Peyton to Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania as a fifteen-year-old sophomore. The Methodist affiliated institution cemented his faith and he fell somewhat under the influence of professors George Crooks and John McClintock. He did not share the latter’s fierce abolitionism and almost left the college when McClintock was involved in a notorious riot in the town that freed recaptured slaves and resulted in the death of a slave catcher. He graduated with the class of 1849 and returned home to Virginia to study law with a family friend in Warrenton.

Though his family connections alone guaranteed a bright legal future, the young Conway was an indifferent law student. Despite the urging of his numerous cousins to take up his place as an active defender of the South, he was already having significant problems justifying his beloved Virginia’s maintenance of slavery. Despite this, he served in 1850 as the secretary of the Southern Rights Association in Warrenton, and seemed in his momentary embracing of the recently published racial theories of Louis Agassiz to be searching for any justification for human bondage. Despairing of the law, he pleased his parents at last when on his nineteenth birthday he became a Methodist circuit rider preacher, assigned to the Rockville, Maryland area. During the next three years he rode northern Maryland, literally expanding contacts with the world, which included an influential friendship with a family of Quakers. Most importantly he indulged in the obsessive reading that was to adjust both his ideas about religion and slavery. Under the influence of writers such Ralph Waldo Emerson, he left the Methodist circuit in February, 1853, went north to Boston and enrolled in the Unitarian dominated Harvard Divinity School. While there he met and befriended Emerson and Thoreau and settled his mind against slavery. He was still a southerner, however, and became involved in the famous case of Anthony Burns, a recaptured slave being returned from Boston to Virginia under the new and hated federal Fugitive Slave Law. He refused publicly to rally in support of the action with other southern students but also declined in private to aid abolitionist friends in accosting Burn’s Virginia slave owner --- whom he knew slightly from earlier days in Fredericksburg --- thereby offending both sides.

He graduated from Harvard Divinity and took up a post as minister of the First Unitarian Church of Washington D.C. in late October 1854. All his time in the capital did, however, was to convince him that war over the sectional question was inevitable. In January 1856, he gave his solution for the avoidance of such a violent outcome. He preached from his pulpit the minority opinion that disunion was preferable to civil war and that an independent South would be left to work out emancipation through the moral example of the free labor North. This pleased few members of his congregation on either side of the question and as the sermon gained in national notoriety he was dismissed the following October. He was soon in the pulpit again, however, this time in Cincinnati, Ohio. A far more liberal membership welcomed him and his anti-slavery work there and he continued his development in both study and writing. He also met and married Ellen Dana in June 1856, beginning a sustaining and enduring partnership that was to last almost forty years.

In 1860 Moncure Conway, in the only presidential election in which he ever voted, cast his ballot for Abraham Lincoln. Soon his greatest fears were realized with the outbreak of the Civil War. The state he loved was invaded and his family split. His two younger brothers served in the Confederate Army while he and a sister remained in the North. He did return to the South for a few days in the late summer of 1862 to find and gather his father’s slaves who had fled from Virginia to Washington when Union troops had overrun the Conway plantation. Finding them in hiding in the capital, he transported them through a series of ruses, including playing the slave owner by marching them through pro-slavery Baltimore with a whip to the railway station, to freedom in Ohio.

He declined an offer to serve as a chaplain in the Union Army but accepted a mission on behalf of Wendell Phillips and other abolitionists to explain anti-slavery and the Union cause to a divided Britain. He traveled to London in April 1863 and was well received in intellectual circles. He soon caused a storm, however, when his personal enthusiasm overwhelmed his limited skills as a diplomat when he precipitously offered the Confederate representative in Britain the full opposition of northern abolitionists to any further prosecution of the war in exchange for the immediate emancipation of all slaves held in the Confederate states. Mason rebuffed him publicly in a letter to The Times of London on July 10, 1863, and American abolitionism instantly disowned him. He was forced to explain himself to the United States ambassador, Charles Francis Adams, and apologize for any appearance of treason in his remarks. Humiliated and feeling cut off from his home, he took up a post at the South Place Chapel in London and did not return to the United States.

The South Place Chapel was at the center of a group that had been founded in the early years of the century on the ideals of personal virtue that superceded faith or doctrine and Conway’s new post gave him the chance to bloom as a free thinker. He stayed at South Place for seventeen years, traveling, lecturing, and publishing many of the memorable works that were going to rehabilitate his reputation. He returned home in 1884 at the death of his father but returned to South Place in 1892. In 1897, he was forced to return home again when his wife fell ill. She died on Christmas Day in New York. The couple had raised three children.

With the loss of his dear companion and continued disillusion with what he saw as imperial United States policy, he left home once again to live the rest of his life in London and Paris. He visited to lecture occasionally and remained in touch with his alma mater where, in the year of Conway’s death, his friend and fellow advocate for world peace Andrew Carnegie donated funds to build a hall to bear his name.

Moncure Conway died alone amidst his books and writings in his Paris apartment on November 15, 1907. He was seventy-five years old.

John Osborne

Moncure Conway (American National Biography)

Scholarship
The Civil War found Conway's pro-Union sister and mother in Pennsylvania, his pro-Confederate father in Richmond, and his two brothers in the Confederate army. He supported the Union on the condition that President Abraham Lincoln show progress toward a policy of emancipation. His views were expounded in two powerful propagandistic books, The Rejected Stone (1861) and The Golden Hour (1862), prompting Boston abolitionists to make him coeditor of a new antislavery weekly, The Commonwealth. Just before moving to Massachusetts in September 1862, Conway rendezvoused in Washington, D.C., with thirty-three slaves newly escaped from his father, and resettled them in Ohio. This, and subsequently the Emancipation Proclamation, raised his spirits momentarily, but increasingly the war anguished and depressed him. With his family divided, his boyhood haunts the scenes of savage fighting, and nationwide emancipation not fully achieved, Conway determined to leave the country. He did so in April 1863 on the pretext of making a speaking tour in England. Shortly thereafter, he sent for his family. He would live in London for the next twenty-two years.
John d'Entremont, "Conway, Moncure Daniel," American National Biography Online, February 2000, http://www.anb.org/articles/16/16-00345.html.

Moncure Conway (Notable Americans)

Reference
CONWAY, Moncure Daniel, author, was born near Falmouth, Va., March 17, 1832; son of Walker Peyton and Margaret Eleanor (Daniel) Conway. His father was presiding justice of Stafford county, and his mother a daughter of Dr. John Moncure Daniel, U.S.A., physician in the war of 1812, and granddaughter of Thomas Stone, signer of the Declaration of Independence. He was graduated at Dickinson college in 1849 and studied law in Warrenton, Va. He expressed his sympathy with institutions of the south in articles written for the Richmond Examiner, of which John Moncure Daniel, his cousin, was editor. He soon abandoned law for the Methodist ministry. His political and religious beliefs having changed, he entered the Unitarian divinity school at Cambridge, Mass., where he was graduated in 1854, and became minister of the Unitarian church in Washington, D. C. His anti -slavery sermons in Washington caused much excitement, and by a small majority he was requested to resign his Washington church in 1857, and was succeeded by W. H. Channing. In 1857 he took charge of the Unitarian church at Cincinnati, Ohio, and during the war settled his father's slaves, escaped from Virginia, at Yellow Springs, Ohio. In 1863 he visited England with a view to lecturing and writing in explanation of the connection of the anti-slavery cause with the war for the Union, and was appointed minister of South Place chapel, London, whose " Centenary History " he wrote in 1895. He returned to the United States in 1884. He was married to Ellen, daughter of Charles Davis and Sarah Pond (Lyman) Dana. He founded the Dial (monthly) in Cincinnati in 1860; edited the Boston Commonwealth (1861-63); contributed to Fraser's Magazine and the Fortnightly Review; was London correspondent of the New York Tribune, and afterward of the Cincinnati Commercial; and contributed to Harper's Magazine, "South Coast Saunterings in England" (1868-69). He was made a member of the Author's club, New York, and of the Phi Beta Kappa association; and in London he was a member of the Anthropological institute, the Folklore society, the Society of authors, the Omar Khayyam club and other clubs. He received the degree of L.H.D. from Dickinson college. Among his published works are : Tracts for Today (1858); The Rejected Stone (1861); The Golden Hour (1862); Testimonies Concerning Slavery (1863); The Earthward Pilgrimage (1870); Republican Superstitions (1872) ; Sacred Anthology (1874); Idols and Ideals (1877); Demonology and Devil-Lore (1879); A Necklace of Stories (1880); The Wandering Jew and the Pound of Flesh (1881); Thomas Carlyle (1881); Travels in South Kensington (1882); Emerson at Home and Abroad (1882); Pine and Palm (1887); Omitted chapters of History disclosed in the Life and Papers of Edmund Randolph (1888); George Washington and Mount Vernon (1889); George Washington's Rules of Civility (1890); Life of Hawthorne (1890); Prisons of Air (1891); Life of Thomas Paine (2 vols., 1892), which has been translated into French.
Rossiter Johnson, ed., "Conway, Moncure Daniel," The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, vol. 2 (Boston: The Biographical Society, 1904).

Moncure Conway, Background and Personality (d'Entremont, 1987)

Scholarship
Moncure Conway, to borrow a phrase from Walt Whitman, contained multitudes. He was successively Methodist Minister, Unitarian minister, Theistic minister, freethought minister, no minister at all. He was a Southerner who left the South, an American who left America, a citizen of the world who belonged everywhere and nowhere. He seemed equally at home - and detached - on the Australian frontier (which he visited in 1883) and in a London drawing room. He was both a platform polemicist and a serious scholar whose biography of Thomas Paine is in many ways still the best. He was respectable and Bohemian, gentleman and radical. He had a genius for friendship and a talent for provocation. "I never yet have heard him speak that he did not have something ... worth saying." said Thomas Wentworth Higginson, "nor did I ever hear him speak, I may add, that he did not say something worth differing from."
John d'Entremont, Southern Emancipator: Moncure Conway, The American Years 1832-1865 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), xii.

Moncure Conway, Changing Philosophies (d'Entremont, 1987)

Scholarship
By 1897, at the end of a four-year return engagement at South Place, Conway's philosophy had undergone a striking change from what it had looked like at the end of the American years. Much of his adult career had been spent proclaiming the Emersonian creed that evil is only "good in the making," that the direction of the world was inexorably toward the better, that "progress" could never long be retarded. That faith had supported his break with Virginia. It also had helped provoke his departure from war-torn America and the lessons the war might otherwise have taught, when he adandoned the darkening, guilty New World to find innocence and sunlight in the Old. During his first South Place ministry he had always proclaimed the glory of evolution, ever onward and upward, and the illusory nature of evil, wrong, and pain - things that only "helped" us by alerting us to what was good. Personal and political events in the 1880s made that increasingly hard to believe. By 1897 it was impossible.
John d'Entremont, Southern Emancipator: Moncure Conway, The American Years 1832-1865 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 222.

Moncure Conway, Liberating his Father's Slaves (d'Entremont, 1987)

Scholarship
The resettling of the freedmen had a startling and drastic effect on Conway's flagging spirits. The episode could not have been better timed. At the point when he was feeling most ineffectual and helpless, Conway found a means of accomplishing something concrete for the antislavery cause: he could not save four million slaves, but he could save thirty-three. More than that, the perilous journey through Baltimore must have served to assuage any lingering suspicions Conway (or anyone else) might have had about the connection between his noncombatant status and his courage. In June a beaten man, in August he was a crusader reborn.
John d'Entremont, Souther Emancipator: Moncure Conway, The American Years 1832-1865 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 171.

Moncure Conway (Dickinson Chronicles)

Scholarship
Moncure Daniel Conway was born the second son of an old and distinguished family on March 17, 1832 in Stafford County, Virginia. His father, Walker Peyton Conway, was a prominent slaveholding landowner, a magistrate, and a representative to the Virginia legislature. His mother, Margaret Daniel Conway, could trace her family to the earliest days of the commonwealth. Both his parents had converted to Methodism, he from the Episcopalians and she from the Presbyterians, and the Conway children were exposed at an early age to evangelicalism. Moncure Conway first went to a family school and then attended the thriving Fredericksburg Classical and Mathematical Academy, a school that had educated George Washington and other famous Virginians. He entered Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania as a sophomore at the age of fifteen. Conway advanced quickly at the Methodist affiliated college and graduated with the class of 1849. While there he had begun his career as a writer, founding the College's first student publication, fell somewhat under the influence of Professor John McClintock, and had also embraced the Methodist Church. After thoughts about a career in law, and despite emerging doctrinal doubts, the young graduate became a circuit-riding Methodist minister in 1851. Increasingly uncomfortable with conformity, he soon left Methodism for Unitarianism and enrolled at Harvard's Divinity School. There he met Ralph Waldo Emerson, who had provided much of the impetus of Conway's intellectual development during his undergraduate years. On the great ethical and cultural question of the day, Conway was emerging as an abolitionist. By now the young Virginia aristocrat was well on his way to the freethinking that would make him famous.

Graduating from Harvard in 1854, he first took the Unitarian pulpit in Washington, D.C. His time in the capital was not a happy one, however. In theology Conway was becoming more radical, while his views on emancipation recommended the minority opinion that disunion was preferable to civil war. An independent South would be left to work out emancipation through the moral example of the North. This opinion pleased few members of his congregation on either side of the question, and he was relieved to take up a position in Cincinnati in late 1855 having despaired of advancing abolitionism with work in the south itself. In Ohio, a far more liberal membership welcomed him and he was able to continue his development in both study and writing. He also married Ellen Dana, the daughter of Charles Dana, and together the couple formed a strengthening partnership that ended with them leaving the Unitarian Church.

Meanwhile, Conway's greatest fears were realized with the outbreak of the Civil War and the splitting of both his family and his abiding love for his home state of Virginia. Still, he accepted a mission on behalf of northern abolitionists to explain anti-slavery and the Union cause to a divided Britain. He traveled to London in April 1863 and was well received in intellectual circles, befriending another one of his early heroes, Thomas Carlyle, as well as Robert Browning. But with a personal enthusiasm that overwhelmed his limited skills as a diplomat, he precipitously offered the Confederate representative in Britain, James Murray Mason, the full opposition of northern abolitionists to any further prosecution of the war in exchange for immediate emancipation of all slaves held in the Confederate states. Mason rebuffed him publicly, American abolitionism immediately disowned him, and he prudently explained himself to the United States ambassador, Charles Francis Adams, apologizing for any appearance of treason in his remarks. Feeling cut off from home, North and South, he took up an appointment at the South Place Chapel in London. The South Place Society, later the South Place Ethical Society, had been founded fifty years before on the ideals of personal virtue superceding faith or doctrine and Conway's new post gave him the opportunity to bloom as a student of religion and free thought. The more open intellectual climate of Britain also helped his exchanges of ideas with people as diverse as Swinburne, the Rossettis, and Annie Besant. Conway stayed for seventeen years, lecturing, traveling, and publishing some of his most well-known and memorable works.

When he returned to the United States in 1884 upon the death of his father, his publications had rehabilitated his reputation. This standing he enhanced with further works on Edmund Randolph, George Washington, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Thomas Paine to the point that his increasingly conservative alma mater awarded him an honorary doctorate in 1892 and asked him to serve as a trustee. In 1892, however, he returned to London and his position at the South Place Society. This tenure was cut short five years later in tragic circumstances when he was forced to bring his ailing wife home to die in New York on Christmas Day, 1897. The devoted couple had raised three children: two sons, Eustace (1859) and Dana (1865), and a daughter, Mildred (1868), who would later marry the accomplished architect Phillip Sawyer.

With the loss of his life's companion, coupled with the imperialistic "spreadeaglism" that he saw as afflicting his country in the advent of the Spanish-American War, Conway left his homeland again. He lived the remainder of his life mostly in Paris and London, with periodic visits to lecture in the United States, writing further on Paine (including a two-volume biography), and speaking in the cause of free thought and world peace. In 1905, his friend Andrew Carnegie donated funds to Dickinson College for the construction of Conway Hall which was used as the preparatory school until 1917 and then served as a freshman residence hall. Moncure Daniel Conway died alone amidst his books and writings in his Paris apartment on November 15, 1907. He was seventy-five years old.
John Osborne and James W. Gerencser, eds., “Moncure Daniel Conway,” Dickinson Chronicles, http://chronicles.dickinson.edu/encyclo/c/ed_ConwayMD.html.

Moncure Conway (New York Times)

Obituary
Moncure D. Conway’s Body Cremated.
PARIS, Nov. 18.—the body of the Rev. Moncure D. Conway of New York, the distinguished American author who died here suddenly Nov. 15, was cremated at the Père Lachaise Cemetery to-day, in the presence of many friends.  The ashes will probably be sent to the United States later.
“Moncure D. Conway’s Body Cremated,” New York Times, November 19, 1907, p. 9: 5.

Moncure Conway (New York Observer and Chronicle)

Obituary

Moncure D. Conway
The Rev. Moncure D. Conway, D.D., died in Paris on November 15.  He was born in Stafford County, Va., March 17, 1832.  he was educated at the schools in Fredericksburg, Va., and at Dickinson College, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated in 1849.  After studying law, he became a writer for the Richmond Examiner.  Mr. Conway then entered the Methodist ministry.  Soon thereafter he entered the Divinity School at Cambridge, Mass.  He was graduated in 1854, and returned to the South.  From Falmouth he went to Washington, where he became the pastor of the Unitarian Church, from which pastorate he was dismissed on account of his radical anti-slavery discourses.  He next went to Cincinnati as pastor of the Unitarian Church there.  After a short time in Boston, in 1863, Mr. Conway went to England, and in less than a year he had become the pastor of South Place Chapel, London, where he remained until 1884, when he returned to the United States.  Mr. Conway became a warm admirer and friend of Abraham Lincoln, and left many interesting reminiscences of that friendship.  He was a member of several learned societies in London, lectured occasionally at the Royal Institute, and in New York was a member of many clubs.

“Moncure D. Conway,” New York Observer and Chronicle, November 21, 1907, p. 674: 2.
Date Event
Moncure Conway is born in Stafford County, Virginia
Moncure Conway enters Dickinson College
Dickinson College holds annual commencement ceremonies
Moncure Conway begins short-lived legal study in Warrenton, Virginia
Moncure Daniel Conway becomes junior minister for Methodist Church
Moncure Conway enters Harvard Divinity School
- Moncure Conway serves as minister at Unitarian Church in Washington, D.C.
- Moncure Conway serves as minister at Unitarian Church in Cincinnati, Ohio
Moncure Conway marries Ellen Dana in Cincinnati, Ohio
Eustace Conway, first son of Moncure Conway, is born in Cincinnati, Ohio
Emerson Conway, second son of Moncure Conway, is born in Cincinnati, Ohio
Moncure Conway publishes "The Rejected Stone" arguing for emancipation
Union forces advance on Stafford County, Virginia
Moncure Conway publishes "The Golden Hour"
Moncure Conway liberates his father's slaves
Moncure Conway becomes co-editor of "The Commonwealth, " an anti-slavery journal
Moncure Conway sails to England to gain support for the Union
Mason affair results in severe embarrassment for Moncure Conway
Moncure Conway becomes minister at South Place Chapel in London, England
Dana Conway, third son of Moncure Conway, is born in London, England
Mildred Conway, first daughter of Moncure Conway, is born in London, England
- Moncure Conway returns to America to conduct a lecture tour
Moncure Conway moves back to America, settles in New York City
- Moncure Conway returns to South Place Chapel in London
Moncure Conway moves back to New York City after his wife is diagnosed with cancer
- Moncure Conway leaves America for Paris, France
Moncure Conway attends the Nathaniel Hawthorne centennial celebration in Concord, Massachusetts
Moncure Conway dies in Paris, France
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Recollection of Moncure Daniel Conway, Professor Spencer Fullerton Baird
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Boston (MA) Liberator, "Selections," February 22, 1856
Boston (MA) Liberator, "Letters from Friends of the Cause," February 18, 1859
Boston (MA) Liberator, “An Ancient and A Modern Compromise,” April 19, 1861
New York National Anti-Slavery Standard, "Speech of Rev. M.D. Conway," August 9, 1862
Chicago Style Entry Link
"Conway Family." William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine 12 (1904): 264-267. view record
"Estimate." Bookman 26 (1908): 461. view record
"Grace at Washington's Table." The Nation 51 (1890): 461. view record
"Old London Folk Tale." Harper's Monthly Magazine 103 (1901): 459-464. view record
"Portrait." Review of Reviews 30 (1904): 755. view record
"Portrait" Critic 49 (1906): 6. view record
"Present Situation of Sunday Opening." Westminster Review 145 (1896): 598-600. view record
"Sketch." The Nation 85 (1907): 463-464. view record
Abbott, Lyman. "Nature of Prayer." The North American Review 186 (1907): 337-339.
view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Autobiography, Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway. 2 vols. New York: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1904.
view record
Special Memorial Number to Dr. Moncure D. Conway. London: South Place Ethical Society, A. Bonner, 1907. view record
Anonymous. "A Virginian Who Paved the Way." The Washington Post, 2004.  view record
Biddle, Edward W. Moncure D. Conway and Conway Hall: Historical Address. Carlisle, PA: Hamilton Library Association, 1919. view record
Boorstein, Michelle. "From 1850s Virginia, An Abolitionist Hero Emerges." The Washington Post, 2004. view record
Burtis, Mary Elizabeth. Moncure Conway, 1832-1907. New Brunswick, N.J: Rutgers University Press, 1970. view record
Conway, Eustace and Moncure Daniel Conway. Selections from the library of Mr. Eustace Conway of New York: Including Books and Manuscripts Formerly Belonging to the Late Moncure D. Conway. New York: Anderson Galleries, 1920. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. "Abolitionism and Southern Independence." William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine 25 (1916): 137-138.  view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Emerson at Home and Abroad. Boston: James R. Osgood and Company, 1882. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Farewell Discourses, Delivered at South Place Chapel, Finsbury, London. London: E.W. Allen, 1884. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Moncure Conway Letters. Washington, DC: Library of Congress Photoduplication Service, 1971. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Moncure D. Conway Addresses and Reprints, 1850-1907: Published and Unpublished Work Representing the Literary and Philosophical Life of the Author. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1909. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. On the Eve of Seventy-Four. London: South Place Ethical Society, 1906. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Republican Superstitions as Illustrated in the Political History of America. London: H. S. King & Co., 1872. view record
Conway, Moncure Daniel. Testimonies Concerning Slavery. London: Chapman and Hall, 1864. view record
D'Entremont, John. Moncure Conway, 1832-1907: American Abolitionist, Spiritual Architect of "South Place," Author of "The Life of Thomas Paine." London: South Place Ethical Society, 1977. view record
D'Entremont, John. Southern Emancipator: Moncure Conway, The American Years 1832-1865. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. view record
Davidson, J. A. "After Moncure Daniel Conway." The Christian Century 80 (1963): 277. view record
Dialectical Society. Debate on Mr. Moncure D. Conway's Paper "On Marriage" April, 1871. London: 1871. view record
Earle, Jonathan. “The Making of the North's 'Stark Mad Abolitionists': Anti-Slavery Conversion in the United States, 1824-54.” Slavery & Abolition 25, no. 3 (2004): 59-75. view record
Easton, Loyd David. "Hegelianism in Nineteenth-Century Ohio." Journal of the History of Ideas 23 (1962): 355-378. view record
Emerson, Edward D. Moncure D. Conway. Boston: 1908. view record
Gallaher, Helen. Moncure Daniel Conway: Author and Preacher, 1832-1907: A Bibliography. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1938. view record
Mansford, Wallis. Dr. Moncure D. Conway. Westminster, 1937. view record
Marraro, Howard Rosario. "Mazzini on American Intervention in European Affairs". Journal of Modern History 21 (1949): 109-114. view record
Robertson, J. M. The Life Pilgrimage of Moncure Daniel Conway: Delivered at South Place Institute on March 27, 1914. London: Watts, 1914. view record
Smith, W. S. "Moncure Daniel Conway at South Place Chapel." The Christian Century 80 (1963): 468. view record
Smith, Warren Sylvester. "'The Imperceptible Arrows of Quakerism:' Moncure Conway at Sandy Spring." Quaker History 52 (1963): 19-26. view record
Uchimura, Kanzo. A Japanese Christian on Dr. Conway. London: South Place Ethical Society, 1908.   view record
Waldron, Randall H. "Walt Whitman's British Connection: Letters of William Douglas O'Connor." Bibliographical Society of America Papers 75 (1981): 271-300. view record
Walker, Edwin C. A Sketch and an Appreciation of Moncure Daniel Conway, Freethinker and Humanitarian: An Address at the Paine-Conway Memorial Meeting of the Manhattan Liberal Club, January 31, 1908. New York: E.C. Walker, 1908. view record
Winslow, Donald F. "Francis W. Newman's Assessment of John Sterling: Two Letters." English Language Notes 11 (1974): 278-283. view record
How to Cite This Page: "Conway, Moncure Daniel," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, http://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/node/5456.