Buchanan, James

James Buchanan, fifteenth president of the United States, was born near Mercersburg, Pennsylvania on April 23, 1791 to parents of Scots-Irish descent. Buchanan attended Mercersburg Academy until 1807, when he entered the junior class of Dickinson College. Upon graduation, Buchanan began to study law and dabble in politics. He quickly gained prominence, serving in the Pennsylvania House in 1814 and 1815 as a Federalist and then in the 1820s in the U.S. Congress. In 1831, Andrew Jackson appointed him minister to Russia. Later in the decade, Buchanan served in the U.S. Senate. He served as Secretary of State under James K. Polk and as minister to Great Britain under Franklin Pierce. In 1856, Buchanan was the Democratic presidential nominee and defeated Republican John C. Fremont in a three-way contest that included former President Millard Fillmore. Buchanan's presidency was a stormy one, filled with controversy and numerous domestic difficulties. Buchanan was earnest in his efforts to meet the sectional crisis, but the attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861 not only brought the start of the Civil War, but also seemed to cement historical opinion that he was one of the least effective presidents in United States history despite being one of the best prepared. Frustrated and exhausted, James Buchanan retired to his estate, Wheatland, in Lancaster where he wrote his memoirs, the first presidential memoirs in American history. He died at Wheatland on June 1, 1868. (By John Osborne)
Life Span
to
Dickinson Connection
Class of 1809
Full name
James Buchanan
Place of Birth
Birth Date Certainty
Exact
Death Date Certainty
Exact
Gender
Male
Race
White
Sectional choice
North
Origins
Free State
No. of Siblings
10
No. of Spouses
0
No. of Children
0
Family
James Buchanan (Father), Elizabeth Speer Buchanan (Mother), Mary Buchanan (Sister, 1789-1791), Jane Buchanan (Sister, 1793), Maria Buchanan (Sister, 1795), Sarah Buchanan (Sister, 1798), Elizabeth Buchanan (Sister, 1800, died in infancy), Harriet Buchanan (Sister, 1802), William Speer Buchanan (Brother, 1805), George Washington Buchanan (Brother, 1808), John Buchanan (Brother, 1804), Harriet Rebecca Lane Johnston (Niece, 1830-1903)
Education
Dickinson (Carlisle College)
Occupation
Politician
Diplomat
Attorney or Judge
Businessman
Relation to Slavery
Slaveholder who freed slaves
Political Parties
Federalist
Democratic
Government
President
Jackson Administration (1829-37)
Polk Administration (1845-49)
Pierce Administration (1853-57)
Buchanan Administration (1857-61)
Diplomat
US Senate
US House of Representatives
State legislature
Military
US military (Pre-Civil War)
Slaveholding in 1860
0
Children in 1860
0
Occupation in 1860
President of the United States of America
Political Party in 1860
Democratic
Residence in 1860
Religion in 1860
Presbyterian
Marital status in 1860
Single

James Buchanan (Dickinson Chronicles)

Scholarship
James Buchanan, fifteenth president of the United States, was born near Mercersburg, Pennsylvania on April 23, 1791 to parents of Scotch-Irish descent. Buchanan attended the Mercersburg Academy until the fall of 1807, when he entered the junior class of Dickinson College.

He found the school to be in "wretched condition" with "no efficient discipline." However, his own behavior while at Dickinson was far from exemplary; he was expelled during the fall vacation of 1808 for bad behavior. After making a pledge of good behavior to his minister, Dr. John King (a college trustee), Buchanan was readmitted to Dickinson. In his senior year, he felt slighted by the faculty because he did not win the top award of the College for which his literary society had nominated him. Buchanan commented, "I left college, . . . feeling little attachment to the Alma Mater."

Upon graduation, Buchanan began to study under the prominent Lancaster lawyer James Hopkins. After being admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar in 1812, he quickly gained prominence, and was elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1814 and 1815 as a Federalist. Thus began Buchanan’s long career as a public servant. In 1820, he was elected to the U. S. House of Representatives. With the extinction of the Federalist party in 1824, he joined the Democrats. In Congress, Buchanan was an active opponent of John Quincy Adams and the Panama Mission. He supported Andrew Jackson in the election of 1828, and this support ultimately led to his appointment as the chairman of the Committee on Judiciary. In 1831, Jackson appointed him minister to Russia. On his return to the United States, Buchanan was elected to the Senate; he was reelected in 1837 and again in 1843. By this time, he had gained national prominence in the Democratic party; being passed over for a presidential nomination in both 1844 and 1848, he nonetheless served as Secretary of State under Polk and as minister to Great Britain under Pierce.

In 1856, Buchanan was finally nominated for the presidency, with John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky as his running mate. The campaign platform was based on the finality of the Compromise of 1850 and the non-intervention of Congress concerning slavery in the territories. Buchanan defeated Fremont in the electoral college, although he failed to get a majority of the popular vote. Buchanan's presidency was a stormy one, filled with controversy and numerous domestic difficulties. By the end of his term, the slavery issue and states' rights problems had caused serious divisions in government circles. The election of Abraham Lincoln added fuel to the fire, and between December 1860 and January 1861, numerous members of Buchanan's cabinet resigned. The attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861 not only brought the start of the Civil War, but also seemed to cement the public’s opinion that Buchanan was one of the worst presidents in United States’ history.

James Buchanan retired to his estate, Wheatland, in Lancaster and died there on June 1, 1868
John Osborne and James W. Gerencser, eds.,  “James Buchanan,” Dickinson Chronicles, http://chronicles.dickinson.edu/encyclo/b/ed_BuchananJ.html

James Buchanan (American National Biography)

Scholarship
Tall and stout, with an imposing physique and flowing white hair, the meticulously dressed Buchanan presented a distinguished appearance that was reinforced by his courtly manners. Fussy and legalistic, he had a passion for precision, displayed great diligence, and was an indefatigable correspondent. Although he enjoyed society and dancing and brought a festive air to the White House, he did not make friends easily and was unusually dependent emotionally on his closest associates. He enjoyed good liquor and cigars and spent long evenings conversing with friends. Plodding and unimaginative, he was a useful subordinate but an unsuccessful leader. He lacked a brilliant mind and had no gift for writing memorable words or uttering striking phrases and thus was ineffective at rallying popular support. Acquaintances were struck by his exceedingly cautious nature, and his closest friends found him very timid about voicing his own opinions on controversial issues, even in private. He was sincere and well-intentioned, but his presidential term was largely a disaster. He isolated himself from dissenting views, disliked confrontation, never understood northern feelings against slavery, and was excessively prosouthern in his views, qualities that eventually destroyed his political influence and wrecked his presidency.
William E. Gienapp, “Buchanan, James,” American National Biography Online, February 2000, http://www.anb.org/articles/04/04-00170.html.

James Buchanan (Knupfer, 1996)

Scholarship
[Buchanan’s] understanding of the way politics worked, of the function of political parties, of the nature of the Union and the policies needed to preserve it were inculcated through a party system that rewarded him with increasingly powerful positions and influence…The Democratic Party came to represent, in his eyes, the Union itself; it was a coalition of free and slave interests whose survival depended on the suppression of sectional conflict. The driving force of the Democratic Party had always been the preservation of the Union and, indeed, the party could not survive in its present form without sectional tensions that it could direct to its own purposes. Ever since the creation of the party, sectional pressures welled up from its Northern and Southern wings; the party effectively contained these pressures at the state level, permitting its leaders to use sectional fidelity as a test of party loyalty without carrying it into the national convention. As sectional issues became more acute in the late 1840s and broke into the national organizations with the advent of the territorial question, politicians like Buchanan resorted to familiar methods to limit the damage. Buchanan supported the extension of the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific and opposed popular sovereignty as the party’s program. By the time that he entered the White House, Buchanan was already fully trained in the system’s strategy for handling sectional questions. Firmly believing, along with most politicians of his generation, that slavery’s ultimate fate was beyond the reach of ordinary politics, Buchanan saw only mischief and peril in the agitation of the issue.
Peter Knupfer, “James Buchanan, the Election of 1860, and the Demise of Jacksonian Politics,” in James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s (Selinsgrove: Susquehanna University Press, 1996), 152-153.

James Buchanan (New York Times)

Obituary
Death of James Buchanan, Ex-President of the United States.
    JAMES BUCHANAN, the fifteenth President of the United States, died at half-past eight yesterday morning, at his residence in Wheatland.  He had been seriously ill for several days, and his decease was not unexpected...

[Throughout his political career] Mr. BUCHANAN took very decided ground against the agitation of the slavery question.  He was afraid of its ultimate political consequences, and desired to prevent them by an act of Congress which should shut out the question of slavery from the deliberations of that body.  In 1835, when petitions for the abolition of slavery began to pour in upon Congress, he advocated their reception and a declaration Congress had no power to legislate on the subject.  He shared, with many statesmen of his time, the belief that the agitation of the slavery question might be kept out of Congress and deprived of its power to disturb the councils of political parties.  Time has proved how vain and short-sighted was this policy of repression…

On the accession of Mr. PIERCE to the Presidency, Mr. BUCHANAN was appointed Minister to England.  This fact of his public career chiefly memorable for the part he took in the Conferences at Ostend, subsequently adjourned to Aix la Chapeles—but still known as the Ostend Conference.  This consultation exhibited the importance of the Island of Cuba to the United States in a commercial and [strategic] point of view.  The American Ministers believed that if Cuba was to be transformed into another St. Domingo the example might act perniciously on the slave population of the Southern States, and excite the blacks to insurrection.  In this case they held that the instinct of self-preservation would call for the armed intervention of the United States, and we should be justified in wresting the island from Spain.  Mr. BUCHANAN returned to the United States in April, 1856.  He was tendered the hospitalities of the City of New-York, and his journey to Lancaster resembled a triumphant march. 

The Democratic National Convention, which assembled at Cincinnati in June following, nominated him unanimously to the Presidency; and he was elected over his Republican competitor, Col. FREMONT, by a large majority of the electoral college, receiving 174 electoral votes from 19 states.

    To give even an outline of the exciting political events that agitated the whole country during his term of office would require more space that we have at command; nor would such a recapitulation be necessary.  Those events are still fresh in the recollection of all our readers.  It is hardly necessary to remind them that President BUCHANAN held the North responsible fro the troubles arising out of the Kansas disputes; and in his messages to Congress wrote vehemently against was he styled “the long-continued and intemperate interference of the Northern people with the question of slavery in a timid and vacillating spirit, temporizing with both parties, and studiously avoiding the adoptions of a decided policy.  In his message of December 3, 1860, he characteristically argued that while the Constitution affords no warrant for the secession of a State, it also affords no warrant for the “coercion” of a State that desires to secede, and its compulsory retention in the Union.  To every appeal from the loyal men of the country for an energetic and patriotic opposition to the plots of the Secessionists, his only reply was:  “The South has no right to secede, but I have no power to prevent them.”  Temporizing in this pitiful manner with the gravest crisis that ever fell upon a nation, he did nothing to prevent the accomplishment of secession:  and when his successor, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, was inaugurated, on the 4th of march, 1861, he retired to the privacy of his home in Wheatland, followed by the ill-will of every section of the country.

    During the long and bitter struggled that ensued, Mr. BUCHANAN maintained the strictest privacy.  In 1865 he published a history of his Administration, intended to be a justification of his course on the eve of the rebellion of Southern States.  The attempt was feeble and inconclusive, and made no impression on the judgment of the country.
“Obituary: Death of James Buchanan...” New York Times, June 2, 1868, p. 4: 7.

James Buchanan (Ellis, 1897)

Reference
JAMES BUCHANAN.
FIFTEENTH PRESIDENT.—1857-1861.
James Buchanan was born near Mercersburg, Pa., April 23, 1791. He received his early education at the school near his home, and, entering Dickinson College, was graduated at the age of eighteen [eighteen]. He took up the study of law, and, being admitted to the bar, opened an office in Lancaster, in 1812. Although the fifteenth President is not generally regarded as a military man, yet he made an impassioned patriotic address to his townsmen, when the news of the capture of Washington reached Lancaster, and was among the first to enroll his name for the defense of Baltimore. Happily, perhaps, his services were not needed in the military branch, and so it is impossible to conjecture to what heights of fame he might have attained as a leader of soldiers and a creator of campaigns.

In the autumn of 1814, Mr. Buchanan was elected as a member of the State Legislature, and re-elected a second term, after which he gave his attention to the practice of his profession, in which he attained marked success. He was devotedly attached to a young lady, to whom he became engaged in marriage, but she died unexpectedly, and, true to her memory, Mr. Buchanan remained a bachelor to his death. To lessen his grief, he gave up his intention of withdrawing from politics, and, accepting a nomination for Congress, was elected in 1820.

He was classed as a Federalist, though he had been an ardent supporter of the war of 1812; but he entered Congress, it will be remembered, during the "era of good feeling," under Monroe. There was little sectional feeling at that time, the attentionof the country being turned to internal improvements and the development of its wonderful resources. He remained in Congress for ten years, which carried him into the first part of Jackson's administrations. He was a strong supporter of Jackson, who held him in so high esteem that, in 1831, he appointed him minister to Russia. He negotiated a treaty of commerce, and so won the good opinion of the Emperor that when he departed,in 1833, the Emperor asked him to request the President to send another minister just like him.

Few public men have been so continually in office as Mr. Buchanan. He had been at home a little more than a year, when, in December, 1834, he was appointed to the United States Senate. In that body he did not hesitate to measure swords with the greatest debaters, such as Clay, Webster and Benton, and he held his own against them. He continued loyal to President Jackson throughout his whole aggressive course, and was equally faithful to Van Buren, his successor.

Mr. Buchanan's first appointment to the Senate was to fill a vacancy, but the legislature re-elected him in 1837, it being the first time that such action had been taken by that body. Van Buren tendered the place of attorney-general to him, but he declined, preferring that of Senator, where he believed he could render more efficient service to the party in whose principles he believed. He was elected Senator for a third term, in 1843, and was put forward as the choice of Pennsylvania for the Presidential nomination in the year succeeding, but withdrew his name in order not to injure the chances of Polk.

When President Polk formed his Cabinet, he asked Mr. Buchanan to take the place of Secretary of State. He accepted and was called upon to meet two questions of the utmost delicacy and difficulty. The first was the settlement of the boundary dispute between Oregon and the British possessions. This was settled by treaty in 1846, which fixed the boundary as it is at present. Great Britain and the United States each gave up a part of its claim, and settled upon a middle line as the true boundary. The second was the questionrespecting the annexation of Texas. That, as already shown, resulted in the Mexican War, and finally in the acquisition of more territory by us than equalled [equaled] the area of the whole country at the close of the Revolution.

The election of 1848 resulted in the success of the Whigs, and Mr. Buchanan withdrew to Wheat-land, near Lancaster, where he had purchased a small estate and owned a house. He did not abate his interest in politics, but maintained a large correspondence with the political leaders of the country, his influence being very great. He warmly favored Clay's Compromise measures of 1850. He declared himself opposed to the continual slavery agitation in the North and insisted that the fugitive slave law should be strictly obeyed. His pleas on these questions, although ably put, were as useless as trying to whistle down the whirlwind.

The name of Mr. Buchanan was presented to the national convention, which, in 1852, placed Franklin Pierce in nomination. Naturally, Mr. Buchanan did all he could to bring about the election of Pierce. He took the ground that one of the most dangerous mistakes possible for Americans to make is to elect a man President for no other reason than that he had been successful in war.

President Pierce, upon assuming office, appointed Mr. Buchanan minister to England. He arrived in that country in August, 1853, and remained until the spring of 1856. He filled the responsible office with dignity, and was treated with distinguished courtesy by Queen Victoria and the representatives of Her Majesty's government. When Mr. Buchanan reached his native land, he was a personage of general interest, for many saw in him the next nominee of the Democratic party for the Presidency. He put forth no effort to secure the nomination, and did not believe it would go to him. He was nominated, however, and in the electoral college received 174 votes, to 114 cast for Fremont and 8 for Millard Fillmore.

President Buchanan's management of our foreign relations was remarkably successful, but the dreadful condition of our domestic affairs, with the black cloud of civil war overspreading the sky, riveted the attention of every one. Rapidly and inevitably the chasm opened between the two sections, and events seemed to unite to drive the North and South apart. In 1857, the Supreme Court rendered the Dred Scott Decision, as it was called. Dred Scott was a negro slave, whose master, a surgeon in the army, in the course of his duties, took him into one of the free States. Scott brought suit for his freedom on the ground that slavery was illegal in the State to which his owner had gone with him. Several varying decisions were made until finally the question passed up to the United States Supreme Court, the highest tribunal in the land. There were eight members of this Court, six of whom were slaveholders, and they agreed upon the decision, the other two dissenting.

This decision was to the effect that slaves were not persons, but property, and that a slave owner could take them wherever he chose in the Union, without losing ownership in them, and, furthermore, Congress had no right to forbid slavery in any of the Territories. It followed, as a consequence, that the Missouri Compromise of 1820 was unconstitutional, and that a slave owner could go Boston, New York, Philadelphia or any part of the free States, with his slaves, and that he would not forfeit his rights in them any more than if they were so many cattle or a part of his household furniture.

This decision was gratifying to the South, but so abhorrent to the North that it refused to accept or be bound by it. Many northern Democrats ceased to affiliate with the southern wing. They clearly saw that no more northern elections could be carried upon that issue. Some of them joined the Republicans, who rapidly increased in numbers. Others rallied round Douglas, who argued that the Dred Scott Decision did not mean as much as the southern Democrats claimed. Politics were more jumbled than ever, and it looked as if the whole country was going to ruin.

John Brown, born in 1800, in Connecticut, was a fanatic on the subject of slavery. He and his sons had taken an aggressive part in the fierce warfare in Kansas, on the side of freedom. He formed the wild scheme of freeing all the slaves in the South, by inciting them to rise against their masters. He fixed upon Harper's Ferry, in Virginia, as a good place to begin his crusade, and secretly gathered a small force opposite the town, one night in October, 1859. Crossing the river, they seized Harper's Ferry and took possession of the United States arsenal.

The startling news soon spread and a force of marines was sent from Washington under Colonel Robert E. Lee, who besieged Brown in an engine house, and after a desperate resistance, captured him. He and several of his men were placed on trial, found guilty and hanged at Charlestown, Va., December 2, 1859.

Although Brown was responsible alone for this act, yet the South believed it was an inevitable result of abolition agitation and many believed that leading Republicans had instigated the frightful attempt to array the slaves against their masters and their families. The breach yawned still wider between the North and South.

The political matters were so awry and topsyturvy that in the autumn of 1860, four tickets were placed in the presidential field. The American party nominated John Bell, of Tennessee, on the platform of "the Constitution, the Union and the enforcement of the laws." The northern Democrats put forward Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois, who believed that each Territory should decide the question of slavery for itself, but they were willing to let the Supreme Court decide the question. The southern Democrats, with John C. Breckenridge, of Kentucky, as their candidate, declared that the United States government should protect slavery in the Territories, whenever a slave owner went thither. The Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, and insisted that Congress should forbid slavery in the Territories.

In the electoral college, Lincoln received 180 votes, Breckinridge 72, Bell 39 and Douglas 12. During the remaining days of his term, President Buchanan did all he could to stem the swelling tide of disunion; but several members of his Cabinet were violent Secessionists and used every effort to strengthen the South and hasten the disruption of the Union. South Carolina seceded within the month following the election of Lincoln, and others did the same, until, by the 4th of March, 1861, seven States had declared themselves out of the Union.

Finally, President Buchanan laid down the cares of his most trying office and went to his home at Lancaster, where he died June 1, 1868.
Edward Sylvester Ellis, J.O. Hall, Lives of the Presidents of the United States (Chicago: A. Flanagan Company, 1897), 129-137.
Date Event
James Buchanan born in Cove Gap, Pennsylvania
James Buchanan enters Dickinson College
Dickinson College expels James Buchanan
James Buchanan graduates from Dickinson College
James Buchanan is admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar
James Buchanan enters the Pennsylvania House of Representatives
James Buchanan's fiancée dies
Senate confirms James Buchanan's appointment as minister to Russia
James Buchanan enters the United States Senate
James Buchanan accepts position of Secretary of State
Congress incorporates Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
James Buchanan presents his credentials to Queen Victoria as United States Ambassador to Great Britain
James Buchanan is elected President
Supreme Court issues ruling in Dred Scott Case
President Buchanan and Senator Douglas discuss the Lecompton Constitution at the White House
President Buchanan reappoints Isaac Cook as Chicago Postmaster
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a two day special session in Washington, DC
American sailors on shore leave riot at the port of Colón in Panama
President Buchanan asks Congress for powers to intervene in Central America to protect U.S. citizens and trade routes
President Buchanan vetoes bill donating public lands to support state colleges
The Senate of the United States opens a week long special session in Washington, DC
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a week long special session in Washington, DC
President Buchanan appoints Robert McLane as minister to Mexico
The Senate of the United States ends its week long special session in Washington, DC
The United States recognizes the Liberal government of Benito Juarez in Mexico
José Marta Mata presents his credentials in Washington as minister from the recently recognized Juarez government of Mexico
President Buchanan sets out for the University of North Carolina to give the Commencement Address
Amid great ceremony, the cornerstone is laid for the National Monument at Plymouth Rock
The National Teacher's Association are meeting for their annual conference in Washington, DC
President Buchanan rejects Virginia's call for federal forces to police neighboring states
Colonel Robert E. Lee leads federal troops back to Harpers Ferry to support Virginia's execution of John Brown
President Buchanan sends his annual message to the United States Senate
House of Representatives passes the Homestead Bill
House of Representatives passes the Kansas Statehood Bill and sends it to the Senate
The U.S. Senate passes its version of the Homestead Bill
First Japanese Embassy to the United States received officially at the White House
President Buchanan asks Congress for funding to transport rescued African slaves to Liberia
U.S. Government contracts with American Colonization Society to transport rescued African slaves to Liberia
President Buchanan hosts the visiting Japanese diplomats at an official dinner
President Buchanan invites the Prince of Wales to visit the United States
The Homestead Bill of 1860 passes both houses and is sent to the President for signature
President Buchanan vetoes the Homestead Bill of 1860
Queen Victoria accepts President Buchanan's invitation for her son to visit the United States
Outside the White House, thousands of Democrats hear President Buchanan speak in favor of Breckinridge
President Buchanan visits the British liner Great Eastern, anchored in Chesapeake Bay
The Prince of Wales is in Washington, DC, hosted at the White House
The Prince of Wales visits the tomb of George Washington at Mount Vernon
- Prince Albert makes a brief visit to Richmond, Virginia
President Buchanan's annual message to Congress is delivered to Capital Hill
In Washington DC, President Buchanan meets with the South Carolina congressional delegation
Philip Francis Thomas of Maryland becomes Secretary of the Treasury, replacing Howell Cobb
Secretary of State Lewis Cass resigns over the non-reinforcement of federal forts in South Carolina
President Buchanan designates January 4, 1861 as a national day of fasting and prayer
South Carolina governor asks President Buchanan's permission to occupy Fort Sumter with state troops
President Buchanan sends Caleb Cushing to ask South Carolina to postpone its Secession Convention
U.S. Senate confirms well-known Democrat lawyer Edwin M. Stanton as Attorney-General
South Carolina's commissioners to the United States present their credentials and explain their mission
Secretary of War John B. Floyd of Virginia resigns and is replaced by Postmaster-General Joseph Holt
President Buchanan replies to the South Carolina's commissioners as "private gentlemen"
National day of "fasting, humiliation, and prayer" takes place throughout the United States
Marylander Philip F. Thomas resigns after one month as Secretary of the Treasury
President Buchanan signs the bill to admit free Kansas as the 34th state of the Union
Abraham Lincoln secretly heads directly to Washington arriving in the early morning hours
President Buchanan signs the Colorado Territory into existence
President Buchanan signs the Nevada Territory into existence
United States copyright law for photographs passes
United States copyright law for photographs signed into law
Abraham Lincoln takes the oath as the sixteenth President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol
Outgoing president James Buchanan leaves Washington for his home in Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Former United States Vice-President George M. Dallas dies at his home in Philadelphia
Abraham Lincoln's funeral train leaves Harrisburg and rolls across the Pennsylvania countryside to Philadelphia
Abraham Lincoln's funeral train leaves Philadelphia before dawn and moves across New Jersey
Harriet Lane, former President Buchanan's "First Lady," marries Baltimore banker Henry Elliot Johnson
In Detroit, Michigan, Democratic Party giant Lewis Cass dies at the age of eighty-three.
Queen Victoria and President Buchanan exchange telegraph messages over the new Atlantic Cable.
James Buchanan dies in Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Date Title
Carlisle (PA) Herald and Expositor, "A Bid for the South!," September 8, 1847
Carlisle (PA) Herald and Expositor, "James Buchanan at Home," September 8, 1847
Abraham Lincoln to Lyman Trumbull, June 7, 1856
Abraham Lincoln, Form Letter to Fillmore men, September 8, 1856
Abraham Lincoln, Speech at a Republican Banquet, Chicago, Illinois, December 10, 1856
Washington (DC) National Era, “The Republican Platform,” January 1, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Future Judged by the Past," January 1, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "Black Republicanism in Missouri," January 1, 1857
New York Times, "Kansas Affairs," January 3, 1857
New York Times, “The Tariff Bill,” January 16, 1857
New York Times, "The Joint Committee to Notify the President and Vice-President Elect," February 14, 1857
New York Times, "Cabinet Rumors at Washington," February 20, 1857
New York Times, “The Buchanan Cabinet,” February 28, 1857
New York Herald, "The Decision in the Dred Scott," March 9, 1857
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Agitation of the Slavery Question," March 17, 1857
Carlisle (PA) American Democrat, "Resignation of Gov. Geary," March 19, 1857
New York Times, “Governor Geary’s Last Interview with Mr. Buchanan,” March 28, 1857
New York Times, “The Americans in Kentucky,” April 10, 1857
New York Times, “Dissatisfaction at Walker’s Appointment,” April 15, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Southern Press," April 30, 1857
New York Times, “Kansas Politics,” May 4, 1857
Richmond (VA) Dispatch, "England and America," May 14, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Kansas Given Over By The South,” May 14, 1857
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Fate and the Folly of Compromises," May 25, 1857
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "Southern Rights," May 27, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Administration," June 25, 1857
New York Times, “Kansas,” June 30, 1857
New York Times, “Where is the South?,” July 11, 1857
New York Times, "The New Troubles in Kansas," July 25, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “A Mistake,” August 13, 1857
Carlisle (PA) American Democrat, "Mr. Buchanan's Administration," August 13, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Inconsistency,” October 1, 1857
New York Times, “South Carolina Senator,” October 12, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Union," October 15, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Evils of Organism,” October 15, 1857
New York Times, “The Fall Elections,” October 17, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Virginia and the South,” October 22, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Collapse of Abolitionists,” October 22, 1857
New York Times, “Virginia Politics,” October 26, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “James Buchanan a Mystery to Himself,” October 29, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Douglas’s Organ on Kansas,” October 29, 1857
Boston (MA) Liberator, "Buchanan Democracy," October 30, 1857
New York Times, “Important Rumor,” October 31, 1857
New York Times, “The Republicans and Gov. Walker,” November 18, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "Governor Walker," November 19, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "Gen. Walker and the Administration," November 26, 1857
New York Times, "The Missing Walker," December 14, 1857
New York Times, “Governor Walker in Washington,” December 15, 1857
New York Times, “Secretary Stanton’s Call for an Extra Session of the Kansas Legislature,” December 17, 1857
New York Times, “The Fight in Congress,” December 18, 1857
Abraham Lincoln to Lyman Trumbull, December 18, 1857
New York Times, “Opening of the Presidential Campaign of 1860,” December 23, 1857
New York Times, “Governor Walker and General Cass,” December 24, 1857
Abraham Lincoln, Fragment of a Speech, circa December 28, 1857
New York Times, “Southern Democratic Sentiment Concerning Northern Democrats,” December 30, 1857
New York Herald, “News from Kansas,” December 30, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, “Presidential Intervention Against Slavery,” December 31, 1857
New York Herald, "Kansas," January 4, 1858
New York Herald, "The Slavery Question in Congress," January 5, 1858
John Murray Forbes to N. M. Beckwith, January 17, 1858
New York Herald, "The Approaching Conclusion of the Kansas Comedy," January 27, 1858
New York Herald, "Political Agitation in this Metropolis," Febraury 26, 1858
New York Times, “Douglas’ Kansas Speech,” March 24, 1858
John Wentworth to Abraham Lincoln, April 19, 1858
Salmon Portland Chase to James Shepard Pike, May 12, 1858
Norman Buel Judd to Abraham Lincoln, June 1, 1858
New York Times, "Kansas Affairs," June 3, 1858
John Wentworth to Abraham Lincoln, June 6, 1858
Lyman Trumbull to Abraham Lincoln, June 12, 1858
(Jackson) Mississippian State Gazette, "The Duty of Our Government," June 16, 1858
Boston (MA) Herald, “Illness of President Buchanan,” June 16, 1858
Lyman Trumbull to Abraham Lincoln, June 16, 1858
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Rumored Breaking Up of the Cabinet,” June 18, 1858
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Voice of Kansas,” June 19, 1858
Raleigh (NC) Register, “The Northern Democracy Split to Pieces,” June 23, 1858
New York Herald, “The Hon. Joshua R. Giddings vs. the Administration and the Slave Power,” June 27, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Politics in Kane County,” July 8, 1858
New York Times, "Senator Douglas at Chicago," July 13, 1858
New York Times, "Presidential Candidates," July 14, 1858
Gustave Philipp Koerner to Abraham Lincoln, July 17, 1858
Milwaukie (WI) Sentinel, "Douglas in the South," July 20, 1858
Bangor (ME) Whig and Courier, "Speech of Mr. Lincoln," July 21, 1858
New York Herald, "Lecompton to be Rejected," July 26, 1858
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "Douglas Tottering!," July 29, 1858
Ripley (OH) Bee, "The Most Dangerous Foe," July 31, 1858
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "The Lecompton Constitution Rejected," August 9, 1858
Thomas C. Sharp to Ozias Mather Hatch, August 11, 1858
New York Times, “Death of Lecompton," August 11, 1858
Gustave Philipp Koerner to Abraham Lincoln, August 12, 1858
New York Herald, “The Illinois Campaign,” August 13, 1858
New York Times, “Democratic Prospects In Illinois,” August 18, 1858
New York Times, "Hot Work in Illinois," August 19, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Signs of Fright,” August 20, 1858
New York Times, "Meeting of Douglas and Lincoln," August 23, 1858
Schuyler Colfax to Abraham Lincoln, August 25, 1858
Leavenworth (KS) Journal, "Cheering News," August 26, 1858
Joseph Medill to Abraham Lincoln, August 27, 1858
New York Herald, “No Quarter to Douglas,” August 30, 1858
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "The Little Giant," September 2, 1858
(St. Louis) Missouri Republican, "Douglas - Lincoln," September 2, 1858
New York Times, “Opposition Ratification Meeting in Philadelphia,” September 16, 1858
Ripley (OH) Bee, “More Insubordination,” September 18, 1858
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "Bad State of Things," September 20, 1858
Lowell (MA) Journal and Courier, "The Senatorial Canvass in Illinois," September 22, 1858
New York Times, “Mr. Buchanan’s Troubles,” October 1, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “The Canvass in Iowa,” October 7, 1858
New York Herald, “Treachery in Tammany,” October 9, 1858
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, “A Peep Behind the Curtain!,” October 12, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "The Alton Debate," October 18, 1858
New York Times, “A Georgia Douglas Man,” October 20, 1858
New York Times, “Vice-President Breckenridge for Douglas,” October 23, 1858
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, "Divided We Fall," October 25, 1858
New York Times, "The Illinois Election," November 5, 1858
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, “The Popular Majority,” November 9, 1858
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Abraham Lincoln,” November 10, 1858
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "Rejoicing for Douglas," November 11, 1858
Ripley (OH) Bee, “Retribution,” November 13, 1858
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, "A House Divided, &c.," November 17, 1858
New York Times, “The President and the Filibusters,” November 23, 1858
(St. Louis) Missouri Republican, “What the English Bill has Done for Kansas,” November 27, 1858
New York Herald, “The Struggle Among the Virginia Democracy,” December 5, 1858
New York Times, “The President’s Weakness,” December 7, 1858
Raleigh (NC) Register, “Douglas Stock Rising,” December 8, 1858
New York Times, “The Fillibusters [Filibusters] Again,” December 9, 1858
New York Herald, “The Union of the Opposition Factions,” December 10, 1858
New York Times, “The War Begun,” December 10, 1858
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, “Who are the Agitators?,” December 16, 1858
New York Times, “The Amistad Case,” December 17, 1858
New York Times, “Senator Douglas and the City Government,” December 20, 1858
New York Times, “Who is President of Mexico?,” December 22, 1858
New York Times, “Douglas and the Democracy,” December 25, 1858
(St. Louis) Missouri Republican, “Senator Douglas,” December 31, 1858
Recollection by Gustave Koerner, Senator Douglas Reelected, January 5, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Presidential Aspirants,” January 10, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “For the Lambs of the Flock,” January 12, 1859
New York Herald, “The Present Congress and the Next President,” January 17, 1859
Memphis (TN) Appeal, “The Chicago Times, Senator Douglas and the Administration,” January 18, 1859
New York Herald, “Forney on a Short Allowance,” January 23, 1859
Memphis (TN) Appeal, “President Buchanan against the Pension Bill,” January 23, 1859
New York Herald, “The Case of Douglas vs. Fitch," January 25, 1859
New York Herald, “The Tarff Question in Congress,” January 28, 1859
New York Times, “The Killing of the Pacific Railroad,” January 29, 1859
New York Herald, “The Presidential Question,” January 29, 1859
New Orleans (LA) Picayune, “Letter from Washington,” February 6, 1859
New York Times, “Another Virginia Insurrection,” February 7, 1859
New York Times, “Extension of the Southern Revolt Against the Cuban Scheme,” February 8, 1859
Bangor (ME) Whig and Courier, “Untitled,” February 11, 1859
New York Times, “The Cuban Scheme at the South,” February 15, 1859
New York Herald, “The African Slave Trade and the Law in the South,” February 17, 1859
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “The Douglas and Fitch Row in Congress,” February 18, 1859
New York Times, "News By Telegraph," February 21, 1859
New York Herald, “The Black Republicans and Mr. Douglas,” February 22, 1859
New York Times, “The Political Future,” February 26, 1859
Newark (OH) Advocate, “The Late Domestic Tragedy in Washington,” March 2, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Personal,” March 7, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “Br. [Mr.] Buchanan and the Democratic Party,” March 7, 1859
New York Times, “The President and the Democracy,” March 15, 1859
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “How Old is President Buchanan?,” March 17, 1859
Ripley (OH) Bee, “Untitled,” March 19, 1859
New York Times, “Democratic State Convention at Harrisburg,” March 19, 1859
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “Untitled,” March 22, 1859
New York Herald, “The Late Scattering Elections,” April 6, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “The Beginning of the Presidential Campaign,” April 7, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, "Correspondence of the Mercury," April 15, 1859
New York Times, “A Party Portrait of Dictator Lopez,” April 25, 1859
New York Times, “The President and His Visitors,” April 28, 1859
New York Times, “Growing Ferocious,” May 9, 1859
New York Times, “When Did He Die?,” May 11, 1859
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Langston Sentenced,” May 12, 1859
New York Times, “Democratic Preparations for 1860,” May 17, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “The Oberlin Slave Rescue Cases,” May 18, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Visit of the President to North Carolina,” May 19, 1859
Boston (MA) Liberator, “Letter from the Hon. J. R. Giddings,” May 27, 1859
(Concord) New Hampshire Statesman, “Expenses of the White House,” May 28, 1859
New York Times, “The Virginia Election,” May 30, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Popular Sovereignty in Kentucky,” June 3, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “The President’s Visit,” June 6, 1859
Charleston (SC) Mercury, “An Episode in the Southern Tour of Douglas,” June 10, 1859
New York Times, “Political Letters,” June 16, 1859
Milwaukee (WI) Sentinel, “The Utah Rebellion,” June 16, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Caught,” June 27, 1859
New York Times, “Albany and Richmond,” June 29, 1859
New York Herald, “Mr. Buchanan and the Succession,” July 24, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “Folly,” July 25, 1859
New York Herald,“Mr. Douglas and His Forthcoming Manifesto,” July 31, 1859
New York Times, “An Unwise Letter,” August 5, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Cook and His Enemies,” August 23, 1859
New York Times, "The News From Mexico," September 6, 1859
New York Times, “The Presidential Malaprop,” September 7, 1859
Ripley (OH) Bee, “Untitled,” September 10, 1859
New York Times, “Breaking Up Rapidly,” September 12, 1859
New York Times, “Gen. Scott’s Mission,” September 21, 1859
New York Times, “Suspicious,” October 8, 1859
New York Times, “A Shabby Trick,” October 11, 1859
New York Times, “Buchanan vs. Forney,” October 14, 1859
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Riot at Harper’s Ferry,” October 18, 1859
Entry by Edmund Ruffin, October 19, 1859
Carlisle (PA) American Volunteer, “Negro Insurrection!," October 20, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "Dissolution of the Union," October 25, 1859
Carlisle (PA) American Volunteer, "Governor Wise on the Harper's Ferry Insurrection," October 27, 1859
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "Political Effect," October 31, 1859
New Orleans (LA) Picayune, "Frederick Douglass's Letter," November 9, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "The Other Brown," December 1, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "How a Brave Man Dies," December 6, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, "Virginia Wants the Nation to Foot Her Bills," December 8, 1859
New York Herald, “Judge Douglas and the Administration,” December 11, 1859
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “The Admission of Kansas,” December 17, 1859
Newark (OH) Advocate, “Mr. Douglas and the Presidency,” December 23, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “The President’s Message,” December 28, 1859
Washington (DC) National Era, "Prohibition of Slavery in Nebraska," January 19, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Election of Mr. Forney,” February 4, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Pennsylvania,” March 5, 1860
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “The Troubles in Texas,” March 13, 1860
Lowell (MA) Citizen & News, “Kellogg on Douglas,” March 17, 1860
T. E. Norris to Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter, March 17, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “At War With Mexico,” March 21, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “War With Mexico,” March 23, 1860
Charles Linsley to Robert Hunter, March 26, 1860
New York Herald, “Seward’s Opinion on the Mexican Business,” April 1, 1860
New York Times, “A Bomb-Shell for Charleston,” April 19, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Mr. Buchanan’s Letter,” April 20, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Douglas Nomination,” April 21, 1860
Newark (OH) Advocate, “How Mr. Buchanan’s Patronage Is Dispensed in Ohio,” May 11, 1860
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “The Great Mistake of the Buchanan’s Administration,” May 15, 1860
New York Herald, “Extraordinary Activity of the Slave Trade,” May 22, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Lincoln as He Is,” May 23, 1860
(Jackson) Mississippian, “Kansas in the Senate,” May 23, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune,“The Fillmore Men,” May 25, 1860
Chillicothe (OH) Scioto Gazette, “"The Awful Horrors of the Middle-Passage,"” May 29, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Stop Quarreling,” May 30, 1860
New York Times, “The Presidential Election,” July 4, 1860
Carlisle (PA) American Volunteer, “Decidedly Wrong,” July 7, 1860
Raleigh (NC) Register, “The President on the Stump,” July 18, 1860
New York Times, “The Herald in Harness,” July 21, 1860
Ripley (OH) Bee, "The 'Irrepressible Conflict,'" August 9, 1860
(Montpelier) Vermont Patriot, “A Combination to Cheat the People,” August 11, 1860
New York Times, “The Secretary at War Defended,” September 6, 1860
New York Times, “Spain as an American Power,” September 24, 1860
New York Times, “When to Secede,” September 28, 1860
New York Times, “The Disunion Plot at Washington,” October 26, 1860
Chicago (IL) Tribune, "The Union at the South," October 29, 1860
New York Times, “Buchanan vs. Gen Scott,” November 2, 1860
New York Times, "The Administration and Disunion," November 7, 1860
Newark (OH) Advocate, "Lincoln's Administration," November 9, 1860
Varina Anne Banks Howell Davis to Jefferson Finis Davis, November 15, 1860
Chicago (IL) Tribune, "An Honest Confession," November 17, 1860
New York Herald, “The Disunion Question,” November 19, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Kansas News,” November 23, 1860
John Sherman to William Tecumseh Sherman, November 26, 1860
New York Herald, "General Scott Wanted At Washington," November 28, 1860
New York Times, “Political Assassination,” November 29, 1860
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “An Impossibility,” December 1, 1860
New York Times, “Mr. Buchanan's Style of Conciliation,” December 5, 1860
Chicago (IL) Tribune, "The Prime Cause," December 8, 1860
New York Times, “The President’s Organ on the Crisis,” December 11, 1860
New York Herald, “Not a Bed of Roses,” December 16, 1860
(Montpelier) Vermont Patriot, “A Presidential Election Without A Parallel,” December 22, 1860
Bangor (ME) Whig and Courier, “Have We a Traitor at the Head,” December 25, 1860
Charlestown (VA) Free Press, “The Clouds Lowering,” December 27, 1860
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Organize For Safety,” December 28, 1860
New York Times, “Flight of a Great Criminal,” December 31, 1860
Boston (MA) Herald, “The Crisis Approaching!,” January 8, 1861
New York Times, “Disunion Leading the Way,” January 14, 1861
New York Herald, “Ex-Secretary Floyd on the Crisis,” January 15, 1861
Elihu B. Washburne to Abraham Lincoln, January 30, 1861
Atchison (KS) Freedom’s Champion, “A Costly Administration,” February 2, 1861
New York Times, “The Ultimatum Rejected,” February 9, 1861
(Concord) New Hampshire Statesman, “What Will Lincoln Do?,” February 23, 1861
New York Times, “Traitor Officers,” February 26, 1861
New York Times, “The Plot Against Mr. Lincoln’s Life,” March 4, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "4th of March," March 4, 1861
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, "The Inaugural Address," March 7, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, "Fort Sumter," March 15, 1861
New York Herald, “Old Abe’s Backbone,” April 7, 1861
New York Herald, “The Present Administration Doing What The Last Should Have Done,” April 16, 1861
Boston (MA) Herald, “Union in California,” May 13, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “Resignation of Secretary Cameron,” January 14, 1862
Cincinnati (OH) Gazette, “Excitement in Lancaster,” July 2, 1863
Jeremiah Sullivan Black to Andrew Johnson, Washington, D.C., February 20, 1866
"The Mask Removed," Chicago Tribune, February 21, 1866
Chicago Style Entry Link
“A Page of Political Correspondence: Unpublished Letters of Mr. Stanton to Mr. Buchanan.” North American Review 129 (November 1879): 473-483. view record
“Buchanan, Lincoln, and Duff Green.” Century Illustrated Magazine 38 (June 1889): 317-318. view record
“Collusion between the Supreme Court and Buchanan.” Independent 71 (August 1911): 428-430. view record
“President Buchanan’s Administration.” United States Democratic Review 42 (September 1858): 177-190. view record
"Portrait." History Today 11 (May, 1961): 315. view record
Buchanan’s Political Record: Let the South Beware! Washington, DC: National Executive Committee of the American Party, 1856. view record
Buchanan’s Record. Nashville, TN: Patriot Office, 1856. view record
Catalogue of Pamphlets from the Library of the Late Ex-President James Buchanan: For Sale. Lancaster, PA: S. H. Zahm & Co., 1885. view record
Memoir of James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: Printed by C. Sherman and Son, 1856. view record
Republican Documents. Gen. Jackson and James Buchanan. Blair, Francis Preston, ed. Silver Spring, MD, 1856. view record
Short Answers to Reckless Fabrications, Against the Democratic Candidate for President, James Buchanan. Philadelphia: W. Rice, Printer, 1856. view record
The Agitation of Slavery. Who Commenced! And Who Can End It!! Buchanan and Fillmore Compared. From the Record. Washington, DC: Union Office, 1856. view record
Alexander, Thomas G. "Carpetbaggers, Reprobates, and Liars: Federal Judges and the Utah War (1857-58)." The Historian 70, no.2 (2008): 209-238. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “A Forgotten Journey of an Antebellum President: The Trip and Addresses of James Buchanan Delivered During His Journey to the Commencement of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1859.” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 17 (July 1935): 42-48. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan and Some Far Western Leaders, 1860-1861.” Pacific Historical Review 12 (1943): 169-180. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan during the Administrations of Lincoln and Johnson.” Papers Read before the Lancaster County Historical Society 43 (1939): 67-111. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Bachelor of the White House: An Inquiry on the Subject of Feminine Influence in the Life of Our Fifteenth President: To the Memory of Edwin P. Tanner, Teacher and Friend.” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 20 (January 1939): 154-166. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Conservatives’ Choice, 1856.; A Political Portrait.” Historian 7 (Spring 1945): 77-90. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Court and the Dred Scott Case.” Tennessee Historical Magazine 9 (January 1926): 231-240. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Squire from Lancaster.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 55 (1931): 289-300. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Squire in the White House.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 58 (1934): 270-285. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “John W. Forney, Robert Tyler and James Buchanan.” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 15 (October 1933): 71-90. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Bachelor of the White House: An Inquiry on the Subject of Feminine Influence in the Life of Our Fifteenth President: To the Memory of Edwin P. Tanner, Teacher and Friend.” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 20 (April 1939): 218-234. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip G. “James Buchanan, the Squire from Lancaster.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 56 (1932): 15-33. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip Gerald. “John B. Floyd and James Buchanan.” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 4 (April 1923): 381-388. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip Gerald. "The Buchanan-Douglas Feud." Illinois State Historical Society Journal 25 (1932): 5-48. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip Gerald. James Buchanan and His Cabinet on the Eve of Secession. Lancaster, PA: Privately printed, 1926. view record
Auchampaugh, Philip Gerald. James Buchanan, a Political Portrait, 1856, according to his Friends and Enemies. Reno, NV: n.p.,1946. view record
Baker, Jean H. James Buchanan. The American Presidents Series, ed. Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. New York: Times Books, 2004. view record
Barstow, Benjamin. A Letter to the Hon. James Buchanan, President of the United States. Concord, NH: Office of the Democratic Standard, 1857. view record
Baylen, Joseph O. “James Buchanan’s ‘Calm of Despotism.’” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 77 (July 1953): 294-310. view record
Belohlavek, John M. "The Politics of Scandal: A Reassessment of John B. Floyd as Secretary of War, 1857-1861." West Virginia History 31, no. 3 (1970): 145-160. view record
Binder, Frederick Moore. “James Buchanan and the Earl of Clarendon: An Uncertain Relationship.” Diplomacy and Statecraft 6, no. 2 (1995): 323-341. view record
Binder, Frederick Moore. “James Buchanan: Jacksonian Expansionist.” Historian 55, no. 1 (Autumn 1992): 69-84. view record
Binder, Frederick Moore. James Buchanan and the American Empire. Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 1994. view record
Birkner, Michael J. "Looking up from the Basement: New Biographies of Franklin Pierce and James Buchanan." Pennsylvania History 72, no. 4 (2005): 535-543. view record
Birkner, Michael J., ed. James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s. Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 1996. view record
Birkner, Michael J., moderator. “James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s: A Panel Discussion.” Pennsylvania History 60, no. 3 (1993): 261-287. view record
Bomberger, Christian Martin Hess. Twelfth Colony Plus; The Formative Years of Pennsylvania and a Biography of James Buchanan, Fifteenth and Only President of the United States from Pennsylvania. Jeannette, PA: Jeannette Pub. Co., 1934. view record
Booth, Edward Townsend. Country Life in America as Lived by Ten Presidents of the United States: John Adams, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, William Henry Harrison, James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1947. view record
Bordewich, Fergus M. "Digging into a Historic Rivalry: Abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens Has Long Been Eclipsed by His Pennsylvania Neighbor President James Buchanan, but Recent Archaeological Findings Are Elevating the Reputation of the Architect of Reconstruction." Smithsonian 34, no. 11 (2004): 96-107. view record
Brady, Gerard. “Buchanan’s Campaign in Lancaster County.” Papers Read before the Lancaster County Historical Society 53 (1949): 97-135. view record
Brill, Marlene Targ. James Buchanan: Fifteenth President of the United States. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1988. view record
Bromer, Richard F. “Who Killed Ann Coleman?” Susquehanna 10 (December 1985): 16-21. view record
Brown, J. Hay. “President Buchanan—Misunderstood—Wrongly Judged.” Papers Read before the Lancaster County Historical Society 32 (1928): 88-92. view record
Buchanan, James and Harriet L. Johnston. Papers of James Buchanan and Harriet L. Johnston. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 1977. view record
Buchanan, James and Horace Greeley. James Buchanan, His Doctrines and Policy as Exhibited by Himself and Friends. New York: Greeley & McElrath, 1856. view record
Buchanan, James. Correspondence. Unpublished, 1819-1866. MC 1998.10, James Buchanan Papers, Archives and Special Collections, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA. view record
Buchanan, James. Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress: At the Commencement of the Second Session of the Thirty-Sixth Congress. Washington, DC: G.W. Bowman, printer, 1860. view record
Buchanan, James. Mr. Buchanan’s Administration on the Eve of the Rebellion. New York: D. Appleton, 1866. view record
Buchanan, James. Remarks of Mr. Buchanan, of Pennsylvania, in reply to Mr. Davis, of Massachusetts against the Independent Treasury bill, Senate U.S. March 3, 1840. Washington, DC: Globe Office, 1840. view record
Butler, Joseph Thomas. Wheatland, 1848-1868, the Home of James Buchanan. Dover, DE: University of Delaware, 1957. view record
Cahalan, Sally Smith. At Home with James Buchanan. Ephrata, PA: Science Press, 1989. view record
Cahalan, Sally Smith. James Buchanan and His Family at Wheatland. Lancaster, PA: James Buchanan Foundation, 1988. view record
Callahan, J. M. “The Mexican Policy of Southern Leaders under Buchanan’s Administration.” American Historical Association Annual Report (1910): 135-151. view record
Capen, Nahum. Plain Facts and Considerations Addressed to the People of the United States, without Distinction of Party, in Favor of James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania, for President, and John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, for Vice President. Boston: Brown, Bazin & Co., 1856. view record
Captain of Volunteers. Alta California: Embracing Notices of the Climate, Soil, and Agricultural Products of Northern Mexico and the Pacific Seaboard: Also, a History of the Military and Naval Operations of the United States Directed Against the Territories of Northern Mexico, in the Year 1846-1847 . . . and the Opinion of the Hon. James Buchanan on the Wilmot Proviso, &c. Philadelphia: H. Packer & Co., 1847. view record
Carlson, Robert E. “Buchanan and Western Pennsylvania in 1856.” Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine 40 (1957): 45-57. view record
Carlson, Robert E. “James Buchanan and Public Office: An Appraisal.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 81, no. 3 (July 1957): 255-279. view record
Carlson, Robert E. “Pittsburgh Newspaper Reaction to James Buchanan and the Democratic Party in 1856.” Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine 39 (1956): 71-81. view record
Carlson, Robert E. “James Buchanan-One Hundred Years Ago.” Carnegie Magazine 30 (1956): 312-316. view record
Carroll, Anna Ella and James French. Who Shall be President?: An Appeal to the People. Boston: James French & Co., 1856. view record
Chester, Edward W. “The Impact of the Covode Congressional Investigation.” Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine 42 (1959): 343-350. view record
Choate, Rufus. The Old-Line Whigs for Buchanan! Letters of Rufus Choate and James B. Clay. 1856. view record
Cluskey, M. W. Buchanan and Breckinridge: The Democratic Handbook. Washington, DC: R. A. Waters, 1856. view record
Cole, Allen F. “Asserting His Authority: James Buchanan’s Failed Vindication.” Pennsylvania History 70, no. 1 (2003): 81-97. view record
Coleman, Evan J. “Doctor Gwin and Judge Black on Buchanan.” Overland Monthly and Out West Magazine 19 (January 1892): 87-92. view record
Collins, Bruce W. "The Democrats' Electoral Fortunes During the Lecompton Crisis." Civil War History 24, no. 4 (1978): 314-331. view record
Collins, David R. James Buchanan, 15th President of the United States. Ada, OK: Garrett Educational Corp., 1990. view record
Curtis, George Ticknor. The Life of James Buchanan, Fifteenth President of the United States. 2 vols. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1883. view record
Davis, Kenneth W. “Black, Buchanan and Secession.” Laurel Messenger 15 (February 1975): 1, 8. view record
Davis, Robert R., Jr. "James Buchanan and the Suppression of the Slave Trade, 1858-1861." Pennsylvania History 33, no. 4 (1966): 446-459. view record
Davis, Robert Ralph, Jr., ed. "Buchanian Espionage: A Report on Illegal Slave Trading in the South in 1859." Journal of Southern History 37, no. 2 (May 1971): 271-278. view record
Democratic Party. Proceedings of the National Democratic Convention: Held in Cincinnati, June 2-6, 1856. Cincinnati: Enquirer Company Steam Printing, 1856. view record
Donovan, Sandra. James Buchanan. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications, 2005. view record
Donovan, Theresa A. “President Pierce’s Ministers at the Court of St. James.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 91 (1967): 457-471. view record
Donovan, Therese A. "Difficulties of a Diplomat: George Mifflin Dallas in London." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 92, no. 4 (1968): 421-440. view record
Dryden, Jr. [Waddell, Francis L.]. Old Buck’s Feast; or, The Power of Office. n.p., 1859. view record
Ellis, Edward Sylvester and J.O. Hall. "James Buchanan: Fifteenth President, 1857-1861." In Lives of the Presidents of the United States, 129-137. Lives of the Presidents of the United States. Chicago: A. Flanagan Company, 1897. view record
Emsley, Bert. "James Buchanan and the Eighteenth Century Regulation of English Usage." PMLA 48 (1933): 1154-1166. view record
Evans, Charles F. H. “The Ancestry of President James Buchanan.” American Genealogist 52 (January 1976): 27-29. view record
Farley, Foster M. "William B. Reed: President Buchanan's Minister to China." Pennsylvania History 37, no. 3 (1970): 269-280. view record
Faulkner, Thomas C. Faulkner’s History of the Revolution in the Southern States Including the Special Messages of President Buchanan—the Ordinances of Secession of the Six Withdrawing States . . . etc. New York: J. F. Trow, 1861. view record
Fields, Kevin M. “A Tragic but Innocent Character: The Buchanan Presidency Reconsidered.” Journal of the Lancaster County Historical Society 104, no. 4 (2002): 196-207. view record
Gibson, Gail M., and William A. Hunter. James Buchanan. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1992. view record
Gillan, W. Rush. “James Buchanan.” Kittochtinny Historical Society Papers 2 (1901): 181-209. view record
Gillan, W. Rush. James Buchanan. A Paper. Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Bar Association, 1905. view record
Harmon, George D. “An Indictment of the Administration of President James Buchanan and His Kansas Policy.” Historian 3 (Autumn 1940): 52-68. view record
Harmon, George D. “President James Buchanan’s Betrayal of Governor Robert J. Walker of Kansas.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 53 (1929): 51-91. view record
Harmon, George Dewey. President James Buchanan’s Betrayal of Governor Robert J. Walker of Kansas. Philadelphia: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1929. view record
Hensel, William U. “James Buchanan as a Lawyer.” University of Pennsylvania Law Review 60 (1912): 546-573. view record
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