United States Capitol, Washington DC

Place Unit Type
Location or Site
Containing Unit
Date Type
"Copperhead" Democrat Daniel Voorhees of Indiana is removed from his congressional seat Campaigns/Elections
A congressional committee reports that Senator Benjamin Stark of Oregon is a southern sympathizer Lawmaking/Litigating
A deadly letter bomb sent to Supreme Court Justice Stephen Field at the Capitol is defused safely Crime/Disasters
- Abraham Lincoln serves a single term in the United States House of Representatives Legal/Political
Abraham Lincoln takes the oath as the sixteenth President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol Lawmaking/Litigating
At eight o'clock in the morning President Lincoln begins his twelve-day journey home from Washington D.C. Personal
At the U.S. Capitol, debate begins in the House on the proposed 13th Amendment to the Constitution Lawmaking/Litigating
At the U.S. Capitol, the House of Representatives passes the Civil Rights Bill of 1866 Lawmaking/Litigating
At the U.S. Capitol, the Senate passes the Civil Rights Bill of 1866 Lawmaking/Litigating
At the U.S. Capitol, the vote in the House on the proposed 13th Amendment to the Constitution fails Lawmaking/Litigating
Commercial telegraph service inaugurated in Washington, D.C. Business/Industry
Congress authorizes the first stamped newspaper-wrappers Lawmaking/Litigating
Congress authorizes the size and structure of the peacetime U.S. Army of 76,000 men. Lawmaking/Litigating
Controversial nominee for District Attorney of California confirmed in the U.S. Senate on party lines Campaigns/Elections
Daniel Gott of New York introduces his resolution to ban slavery in the District of Columbia Slavery/Abolition
Edward Payson Weston sets off to walk from Boston to Washington DC to pay off an election bet Education/Culture
Edward Payson Weston, having walked from Boston, arrives in Washington DC four hours late Education/Culture
Fire at the U.S. Capitol destroys valuable books and artifacts Cultural
Governor Crawford of Kansas appoints Edmund Ross to succeed James H. Lane in the U.S. Senate. Campaigns/Elections
Hannibal Hamlin takes the oath as fifteenth Vice President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol Lawmaking/Litigating
House of Representatives passes the Kansas Statehood Bill and sends it to the Senate Lawmaking/Litigating
House Republicans vote to set up a joint committee to determine the suitability of Southern representation Lawmaking/Litigating
In Columbus, Ohio, Lambdin P. Milligan walks free after almost two years in prison Lawmaking/Litigating
In Congress, John J. Crittenden introduces his half of a resolution limiting Union war aims Lawmaking/Litigating
In Congress, Representative Harris of Maryland is immediately censured for disloyal comments in debate Lawmaking/Litigating
In Congress, Representative Long of Ohio is censured for suggesting the recognition of the Confederacy Lawmaking/Litigating
In Little Rock, the Arkansas legislature chooses the famous Methodist Andrew Hunter as U.S. Senator Campaigns/Elections
In Nashville, a special session of the Tennessee Legislature votes to ratify the Fourteenth Amendment. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Nebraska Territory, John Taffe is elected to become the first U.S. Representative from the new state. Campaigns/Elections
In the hotly contested election for Speaker of the House, Thomas Bocock withdraws Lawmaking/Litigating
In the hotly contested Speaker's election, Democrat John Millson of Virginia comes to within eighteen votes of success Lawmaking/Litigating
In the Senate, Andrew Johnson introduces his half of the joint resolution limiting Union war aims Lawmaking/Litigating
In the U.S. Senate, Henry Wilson of Massachusetts proposes the size of the peacetime Army Lawmaking/Litigating
In the U.S. Senate, packed galleries cheer Senator Benjamin of Louisiana's defiant speech Lawmaking/Litigating
In the U.S. Senate. Kentuckian Garrett Davis proposes combining six New England states into just two. Lawmaking/Litigating
In the United States Senate, Albert G. Brown of Mississippi insists on the definition of slaves as property Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., the House names its nine members of the new Joint Committee on Reconstruction Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., the House of Representatives passes the Thirteen Amendment outlawing slavery Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., the House passes the bill to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., the U.S. Senate names its six members of the new Joint Committee on Reconstruction Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington D.C., the U.S. Senate votes to repeal all remaining Federal Fugitive Slave Acts Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 26th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 27th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 29th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington DC, the 30th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, the 31st Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, the 32nd Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington DC, the 33rd Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
In Washington, Congress passes the Third Military Reconstruction Bill, over President Johnson's veto. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, D.C., the U.S. Senate authorizes use of the metric system in government departments. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, DC, Tennessee is readmitted to full representation the United States Congress Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, DC, the 41st Congress of the United States ends its first session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 41st Congress of the United States opens its second session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 42nd Congress ends its first session. Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 42nd Congress ends its third session and finishes its term Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 42nd Congress of the United States ends its second session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 43rd Congress ends its second session and finishes its term Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 43rd Congress of the United States ends its first session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the 44th Congress ends its first session Legal/Political
In Washington, DC, the House agrees Senate changes to the Reconstruction Bill and the measure goes to President Johnson for signature. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, DC, the House of Representatives passes the Reconstruction Bill of 1867. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, DC, the U.S. Senate passes an amended Reconstruction Bill of 1867. Lawmaking/Litigating
- In Washington, DC, the United States Senate is sitting in Special Session Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, House of Representatives votes to overturn the presidential veto of the Civil Rights Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, President Johnson vetoes the Freedmen's Bureau Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, President Lincoln signs a bill to establish a separate Department of Agriculture Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, President Lincoln signs the bill enabling the statehood of the Nevada Territory Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, Senator Trumbull introduces measures to extend the authority of the Freedmen's Bureau Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the House Judiciary Committee reports and recommends the impeachment of President Johnson. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the House of Representatives passes the Freedmen's Bureau Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the House of Representatives votes 125-7 to establish a Department of Agriculture Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the Senate fails to over-ride President Johnson's veto of the Freedmen's Bureau Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the Senate passes measures to extend the authority of the Freedmen's Bureau Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the Senate votes to strike down the color bar on railroad cars in the District of Columbia Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. House creates its "Committee of Thirty-Three" on the sectional crisis Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. Senate begins the process of enabling the statehood of the Nevada Territory Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. Senate confirms the official transfer of two Virginia counties to West Virginia Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. Senate passes the proposed 13th Amendment to the Constitution, 38-6. Lawmaking/Litigating
In Washington, the U.S. Senate votes to over-ride the presidential veto of the Civil Rights Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
James Buchanan enters the United States Senate Legal/Political
Jefferson Davis of Mississippi resigns from the United States Senate Lawmaking/Litigating
John W. Forney returns as Clerk of the House, this time as a Republican Lawmaking/Litigating
- John W. Forney serves as secretary of the United States Senate Personal
Members of the House of Representatives meet to elect a Speaker Lawmaking/Litigating
On a party line vote, the U.S. Senate votes to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia Lawmaking/Litigating
On Abraham Lincoln's birthday, historian George Bancroft delivers a memorial oration before Congress Campaigns/Elections
On an unseasonably warm day, the 39th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
On the Senate floor, Stephen Douglas warns of the danger of the moment and calls for compromise Lawmaking/Litigating
Philip Johnson, sitting Pennsylvania Democratic congressman dies suddenly in Washington, D.C. Personal
President Buchanan sends his annual message to the United States Senate Lawmaking/Litigating
President Buchanan's annual message to Congress is delivered to Capital Hill Lawmaking/Litigating
President Johnson rejects the "Tenure of Office Bill" and the Congress over-rides his veto before the day is out. Lawmaking/Litigating
President Johnson rejects the amended Reconstruction Act and Congress easily over-rides his veto on the same day. Lawmaking/Litigating
President Johnson vetoes the Civil Rights Bill of 1866 Lawmaking/Litigating
President Lincoln suggests to Congress ways gradually to end slavery in the United States Lawmaking/Litigating
Rabbi gives opening prayer in the House of Representatives for the first time Religion/Philosophy
Representative Brooks attacks Senator Sumner in the Senate chamber Legal/Political
Republicans once again dominate the Vermont state elections. Campaigns/Elections
Republicans replace John Sherman with William Pennington in the Speaker's election struggle Lawmaking/Litigating
Republicans score significant victories in the West Virginia state elections. Campaigns/Elections
- Second session of the 38th Congress sitting in Washington DC from early January to early March, 1865 Legal/Political
Senator Andrew Johnson of Tennessee defends the Union on the floor of the U.S. Senate Lawmaking/Litigating
Senator George Williams of Oregon introduces the "Tenure of Office Act" in the U.S. Senate. Lawmaking/Litigating
Senator Gwin of California hints in the Senate that his state could join the South if the Union breaks up Lawmaking/Litigating
Senator John J. Crittenden of Kentucky introduces his Compromise in the United States Senate Lawmaking/Litigating
Senator Lazarus Powell survives a U.S. Senate vote to expel him for "seducing citizens into rebellion and treason" Lawmaking/Litigating
Senator Robert A. Toombs recommends that his Georgia constituents vote for secession Campaigns/Elections
Senator Slidell of Louisiana introduces a bill to appropriate funds for the purchase of Cuba from Spain Lawmaking/Litigating
Sitting Senator Solomon Foot of Vermont dies at sixty-three years old in his residence in Washington D.C. Personal
Speaker of the House Orr and Congressman Hughes of Indiana exchange insults and almost come to blows in the U.S. Capital Lawmaking/Litigating
Speaker of the U.S. House refuses resignations of the South Carolina congressional delegation Lawmaking/Litigating
Thaddeus Stevens introduces the First Reconstruction Bill of 1867 in the House of Representatives. Lawmaking/Litigating
The "lame duck" second session of the 43rd Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The "lame duck" third session of the 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 26th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 26th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1839 to mid-July, 1840 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 27th Congress ends its early first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 27th Congress ends its second session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 27th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from late May, 1841 till mid-September, 1841 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 27th Congress opens early, in special session, in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 28th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 28th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1843 till mid-June, 1844 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 28th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 29th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 29th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1845 till mid-August, 1846 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 29th Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 30th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 30th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1847 till mid-August, 1848 Legal/Political
The 30th Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 31st Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 31st Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1849 till late September, 1850 Legal/Political
The 31st Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 32nd Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 32nd Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1851 till late August, 1852 Legal/Political
The 32nd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 33rd Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 33rd Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1853 till early August, 1854 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 33rd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 34th Congress begins a ten day special session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 34th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 34th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early December, 1855 till mid-August, 1857 Legal/Political
The 34th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 35th Congress of the United States ends its term and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
The 35th Congress opens in Washington, DC with James Orr of South Carolina elected as Speaker Lawmaking/Litigating
The 36th Congress ends its first session in Washington, DC and adjourns until December Lawmaking/Litigating
The 36th Congress of the United States ends its second session, finishes its term, and adjourns Lawmaking/Litigating
The 36th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The 36th U.S. Congress is in session in Washington, D.C. Lawmaking/Litigating
The 37th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Legal/Political
- The 37th Congress is in session in Washington, DC, sitting from early July, 1861 till early August, 1861 Lawmaking/Litigating
The 37th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 38th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The 38th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 39th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Legal/Political
The 39th Congress restricts the ability of the White House to dismiss the commanding general of the army. Lawmaking/Litigating
The 41st Congress of the United States comes to the end of its term in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 41st Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 20, 1872 and January 6, 1873 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 21, 1871 and January 8, 1872 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is in session in Washington, DC between early January and mid-June, 1872 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in its third session in Washington, DC between early January and early March, 1873 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC before its holiday recess which begins on December 20, 1872 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC before its holiday recess which begins on December 21, 1871 Legal/Political
- The 42nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early March and mid-April, 1871 Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress opens its "lame duck" third session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress opens its second session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 42nd Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 20, 1873 and January 5, 1874 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is in its second session in Washington, DC, before its holiday recess that begins December 23, 1874 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is in session in Washington, DC between early January and mid-June, 1874 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is sitting in its second session in Washington, DC between early January and early March, 1875 Legal/Political
- The 43rd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC before its holiday recess which begins on December 20, 1873 Legal/Political
The 43rd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 43rd Congress opens its second session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 43rd Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
The 44th Congress ends its second session and finishes its term in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is in its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is in session in Washington, DC between early January and mid-August, 1876 Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is sitting in its second session in Washington, DC between early December, 1876 and early March, 1877 Legal/Political
- The 44th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 44th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 44th Congress opens its second session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 44th Congress returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
The 45th Congress comes to the end of its term in Washington DC Legal/Political
The 45th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The 46th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The body of slain President Lincoln is laying in state in the United States Capitol rotunda Personal
The compromise "Tenure of Office Act" passes the House of Representatives by a vote of 112 to 41. Lawmaking/Litigating
The compromise "Tenure of Office Act" passes the U.S. Senate by a vote of twenty-two to ten. Lawmaking/Litigating
The early first session of the 37th Congress ends in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 38th Congress adjourns for a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 38th Congress ends in Washington DC Legal/Political
- The first session of the 38th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 6, 1864 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The first session of the 38th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to early July, 1864 Legal/Political
- The first session of the 38th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 38th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
The first session of the 39th Congress adjourns for a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
The first session of the 39th Congress ends in Washington DC Legal/Political
- The first session of the 39th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 5, 1866 Legal/Political
- The first session of the 39th Congress is sitting at the capital from December 4 to December 21, 1865 Legal/Political
- The first session of the 39th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to late July, 1866 Legal/Political
The first session of the 39th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
The first session of the 45th Congress closes in Washington, DC and the second session opens the same day Legal/Political
- The first session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The first session of the 46th Congress ends in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The first session of the 46th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between mid-March and the end of June, 1879 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is in recess from its first session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is in recess from its first session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is sitting and closing out its first session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is sitting in its first meeting of its second session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Fortieth Congress is sitting in its first term in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The Fortieth Congress orders its Judiciary Committee to continue impeachment investigations on President Johnson Lawmaking/Litigating
The Fortieth Congress strongly rejects its Judiciary Committee's recommendation to President Johnson. Lawmaking/Litigating
The funeral service for President Lincoln takes place in the White House East Room at noon Personal
The Habeas Corpus Act of 1867 is passed radically adjusting the relationship between state and federal courts. Lawmaking/Litigating
- The House and the Senate are both sitting in a special session that will last till the end of the month Legal/Political
The House of Representatives meets for the first time in its new chamber in the United States Capitol Legal/Political
The House of Representatives passes a non-binding resolution that Jefferson Davis be tried for treason Lawmaking/Litigating
The House of Representatives passes the Wade-Davis Bill setting radical requirements for Reconstruction Lawmaking/Litigating
The House of Representatives requests its Judiciary Committee to investigate impeachment of President Johnson Lawmaking/Litigating
The House of Representatives upholds Senate on banning exclusion from U.S. courts on grounds of race Lawmaking/Litigating
The Prince of Wales is in Washington, DC, hosted at the White House US/the World
The regular second session of the 34th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second regular session of the 34th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December and early March Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 26th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1840 and early March, 1841 Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 26th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 27th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1841 and late August, 1842 Legal/Political
The second session of the 27th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 28th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 29th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1846 and early March, 1847 Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 29th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 30th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 30th Congress sits in Washington, DC between early December, 1848 and early March, 1849 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 31st Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1850 and early March, 1851 Legal/Political
The second session of the 31st Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 32nd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1852 and early March, 1853 Legal/Political
The second session of the 32nd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 33rd Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December and early March Legal/Political
The second session of the 33rd Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 35th Congress adjourns for its ten day holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 35th Congress is in its ten day holiday recess until January 5, 1859 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 35th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 35th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 36th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 36th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The second session of the 37th Congress ends in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 37th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 38th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 6, 1865 Legal/Political
The second session of the 38th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 38th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
- The second session of the 39th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 4, 1867 Legal/Political
- The second session of the 39th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to early March. Lawmaking/Litigating
- The second session of the 39th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 39th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 39th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Legal/Political
The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States comes to an end in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States is in its eighteen day holiday recess Legal/Political
- The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States is meeting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 41st Congress of the United States returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The second session of the 43rd Congress is in its holiday recess between December 23, 1874 and January 5, 1875 Legal/Political
The second session of the 45th Congress breaks for the holiday season Legal/Political
The second session of the 45th Congress closes in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 45th Congress is in its traditional holiday recess till January 11, 1878 Legal/Political
- The second session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC from early January to mid-June, 1878 Legal/Political
The second session of the 45th Congress returns from its holiday season recess Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress breaks for the holiday season Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress ends in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 46th Congress is in its traditional holiday recess till January 7, 1880 Legal/Political
- The second session of the 46th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The second session of the 46th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC from early January to mid-June, 1880 Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The second session of the 46th Congress resumes in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The Senate of the United States ends its ten day special session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The Senate of the United States ends its week long special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a ten day special session in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a three day special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a two day special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
- The Senate of the United States is sitting in a week long special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The Senate of the United States opens a week long special session in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The Senate passes the Crittenden-Johnson Resolution that limits U.S. war aims to saving the Union Lawmaking/Litigating
The special session of both houses of Congress adjourns in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The third session of the 27th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between early December, 1842 and early March, 1843 Legal/Political
The third session of the 27th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 37th Congress adjourns for a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 37th Congress is in a two-week holiday recess until January 6, 1863 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 37th Congress is sitting in Washington DC until early March 1863 Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 37th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC between December 1 and December 22, 1862 Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 37th Congress opens in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 37th Congress returns from a two-week holiday recess Lawmaking/Litigating
- The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States is in its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 41st Congress of the United States returns from its holiday recess Legal/Political
- The third session of the 45th Congress in Washington DC is in its two week holiday recesss Legal/Political
The third session of the 45th Congress in Washington DC returns from its two week holiday recesss Legal/Political
- The third session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington DC from early January to early March, 1879 Legal/Political
- The third session of the 45th Congress is sitting in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 45th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The third session of the 46th Congress begins its holiday recess in Washington, DC Legal/Political
- The third session of the 46th Congress begins its holiday recess in Washington, DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The third session of the 46th Congress opens in Washington, DC Legal/Political
The thirty-fourth ballot in the election for Speaker of the House ends without a resolution Lawmaking/Litigating
The U. S. Senate votes thirty-six to sixteen to admit free Kansas as the 34th state of the Union Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Congress authorizes an Indian Peace Commission to negotiate with hostile Plains Indian tribes. Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Congress completes a bill to establish a new mint in Denver, Colorado Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Congress funds "separate but equal" schools for black children in the District of Columbia Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Congress passes the Wade-Davis Bill that sets radical requirements for Reconstruction Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Congress reverses the Gott Resolution to ban slavery in the District of Columbia Slavery/Abolition
The U.S. Senate fails to override President Johnson's veto of the Colorado Statehood Bill. Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate organizes the impeachment trial of U.S. District Judge West H. Humphreys Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate passes its version of the Homestead Bill Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate passes the initial version of the "Tenure of Office Act" on a vote of twenty-nine for and nine against. Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate trial of U.S. District Judge West H. Humphreys of Tennessee ends with his removal Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate votes 26-14 to confirm Simon Cameron as the new ambassador to Russia Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate votes 38-1 to confirm Noah Haynes Swayne of Ohio to the U.S. Supreme Court Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate votes to ban exclusion from testifying in United States courts on grounds of race Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Senate votes to expel Indiana Senator Jesse Bright as a Southern sympathizer Lawmaking/Litigating
The U.S. Supreme Court decides "Ex Parte Milligan" in favor of the plaintiffs and orders them released Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States Senate expels Missouri Senators Waldo Johnson and Trusten Polk for treason Lawmaking/Litigating
- The United States Senate is sitting in special session in Washington DC Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States Senate occupies its new chamber at the Capitol Lawmaking/Litigating
The United States Senate passes President Lincoln's suggested resolution to help end slavery gradually Lawmaking/Litigating
The War Department gives the remaining strength of the U.S. Army as just over 150,000 men. Battles/Soldiers
Thirty-ninth ballot in the election for Speaker sees John Sherman fall behind for the first time Lawmaking/Litigating
Thomas H. Ford elected as Printer of the House of Representatives in the eighteenth ballot Campaigns/Elections
Three Washburn brothers sit in the Thirty-Fourth Congress Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. House censures former Secretary of War Simon Cameron for his lax fiscal dealings while in office Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Senate confirms Edwin M. Stanton's nomination as Secretary of War on a vote of 36-2 Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Senate confirms well-known Democrat lawyer Edwin M. Stanton as Attorney-General Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee finds the evidence insufficient to expel Indiana Senator Jesse Bright Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee votes to expel Missouri Senators Waldo Johnson and Trusten Polk Lawmaking/Litigating
U.S. Senate votes unanimously for a committee to investigate the Harpers Ferry Raid Lawmaking/Litigating
Ulysses Grant takes the oath as the eighteenth President of the United States at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC Campaigns/Elections
War Department figures indicate only 23,294 thousand volunteers remain from its vast Civil War army. Battles/Soldiers
War Department figures indicate that only eleven thousand volunteers remain from its vast Civil War army. Battles/Soldiers
William H. Bissell denounces seccessionism in speech to US House of Representatives Legal/Political
William Pennington of New Jersey elected Speaker of the House on the forty-fourth ballot Lawmaking/Litigating
With the end of its second regular session, the 34th Congress of the United States finishes its term and adjourns Legal/Political
Date Title
Daniel Webster, Second Reply to Hayne, United States Senate, January 26, 1830
Debate Over Increase of the Army, House of Representatives, January 9, 1847
Debate Over Thanks to Gen. Taylor and Army Resolution, US Senate, February 3, 1847
Abraham Lincoln, Speech in United States House of Representatives: The War with Mexico, January 12, 1848
Abraham Lincoln to William Hernden, June 22, 1848
David Wilmot’s Speech in the House of Representatives, Washington, DC, August 3, 1848
Debate over the River and Harbor Bill, US Senate, August 18, 1852
New York Times, “Congressional Corruption,” January 10, 1857
New York Times, “The Tariff Bill,” January 16, 1857
New York Times, “The Charleston Press on the Death of Preston S. Brooks,” February 4, 1857
New York Times, "The Joint Committee to Notify the President and Vice-President Elect," February 14, 1857
New York Times, “Corruption in Congress,” February 17, 1857
New York Times, “How a Gentleman is Appreciated by Proslavery Fanatics,” March 18, 1857
New York Times, “Mr. Marcy on the Sumner Assault,” September 2, 1857
New York Times, “South Carolina Senator,” October 12, 1857
Washington (DC) National Era, "The Union," October 15, 1857
New York Times, “A New Bankrupt Law,” November 2, 1857
New York Herald, "Kansas as a Slave State," January 7, 1858
New York Times, “Douglas’ Kansas Speech,” March 24, 1858
Boston (MA) Herald, “Kansas as it Passed the Senate,” March 26, 1858
New Orleans (LA) Picayune, "Congressional," June 15, 1858
- Recollection by John M. Palmer, Lincoln-Douglas Debates, 1858
New York Times, “The War Begun,” December 10, 1858
New York Herald, “Another Grand Scheme of Annexation,” January 22, 1859
New York Herald, “Sham Retrenchment,” January 27, 1859
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “The Douglas and Fitch Row in Congress,” February 18, 1859
New York Times, “The Mint,” February 24, 1859
San Francisco (CA) Evening Bulletin, “The National Disgrace of “Honorable” Squabbling,” February 25, 1859
New York Herald, “The Next Presidential Election,” April 10, 1859
New York Times, “The Telegraph and the Presidency,” September 9, 1859
New York Times,“Sham Apologies,” December 13, 1859
Chicago (IL) Press & Tribune, “Who are the Disorganizers?,” January 31, 1860
Boston (MA) Advertiser, “The Power to Compel Witnesses,” February 24, 1860
Carlisle (PA) Herald, "Hazlett and Stevens,” March 14, 1860
Chicago (IL) Press and Tribune, “Admission of Kansas,” April 13, 1860
New York Times, “Party Contests,” April 28, 1860
Ripley (OH) Bee, “The Admission of Kansas,” May 10, 1860
(Jackson) Mississippian, “Kansas in the Senate,” May 23, 1860
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “Who Began It?,” September 21, 1860
Ripley (OH) Bee, “Southern Pranks,” November 15, 1860
Fayetteville (NC) Observer, “A Remarkable Statement,” December 20, 1860
Elihu B. Washburne to Abraham Lincoln, January 30, 1861
New York Herald, “Greeley for Senator, Why Not?,” February 3, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “How are the Mighty Fallen!,” February 4, 1861
Richmond (VA) Dispatch, “The Irrepressible Conflict,” February 13, 1861
Abraham Lincoln, First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1861, Washington, DC
(Montpelier) Vermont Patriot, “The Policy of the Administration,” March 30, 1861
Cleveland (OH) Herald, “The Feat of the Zouaves,” May 11, 1861
Entry by Kate Stone, July 4, 1861
New York Times, “How to Treat the Vallandighams,” July 13, 1861
New York Herald, “Lovejoy Rebuked,” July 14, 1861
Chicago (IL) Tribune, “A Good Idea,” July 19, 1861
Savannah (GA) News, “Abe Lincoln Assassinated!,” August 13, 1861
Raleigh (NC) Register, “Arrest of a Traitor,” August 14, 1861
The Wade-Davis Manifesto, August 5, 1864
Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address, Washington, DC, March 4, 1865
Recollection by Frederick Douglass, Inauguration of President Lincoln, March 4,1865, Washington, D.C.
Andrew Johnson, "Message to Congress respecting the condition of affairs in the Southern States," December 18, 1865
Lyman Trumbull, Introduction of the Civil Rights Bill, U.S. Senate, January 29, 1866
Willard Saulsbury, Debate on the Civil Rights Bill, U.S. Senate, January 29, 1866
An Act to protect all Persons in the United States in their Civil Rights, and to furnish the means for their Vindication, April 9, 1866
Conclusions, Majority Report of the Joint Committee of the United States Senate and House of Representatives on Reconstruction, June 8, 1866, Washington, D.C.
Conclusions, Majority Report of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction, U.S. Congress, June 16, 1866
James M. Ashley, Motion to Impeach the President of the United States, floor of the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., January 7, 1867.
United States Congress, "An Act to provide for the more efficient Government of the Rebel States," March 2, 1867.
United States Congress, "An Act regulating the Tenure of certain Civil Offices," March 2, 1867
How to Cite This Page: "United States Capitol, Washington DC," House Divided: The Civil War Research Engine at Dickinson College, https://hd.housedivided.dickinson.edu/index.php/node/16662.